2 of 4
2
All this spiritual stuff
Posted: 18 October 2006 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

[quote author=“JustThis”]You have to start by recognizing where you are and I am rarely ‘here’. I don’t meditate to get somewhere, I meditate to get ‘here’. And when I don’t make the effort then I will just drift in the La-La land of thought for hours, days, months or maybe even years.


Unsmoked, it’s more than a little presumptuous for you to look at others who meditate and know what their practice is and what’s good for them. I’ll bet that all those Zen masters you quote spent years doing Zazen.

My quoting Zen masters puts me on a par with Champ and his Bible quotes - a lazy response.  In Japan, I asked all kinds of people if they were interested in Zen, or practiced it at all.  “Brrrrrrr!  No, no!  Too difficult!  Too difficult!”  So I over-react, and make it sound too easy.  Very few people want to sit still and look at the noise of the self.  Still fewer ever stop and see the joke they’ve been playing on themselves (using the ruse of meditation to continue the questing, the activity of the self in a different disguise).

The Normal Mind

“The Way does not require cultivation - just don’t pollute it.
What is pollution?  As long as you have a fluctuating mind fabricating artificialities and contrivances, all of this is pollution.
If you want to understand the Way directly, the normal mind is the Way.
What I mean by the normal mind is the mind without artificiality, without subjective judgments, without grasping or rejection.”  (Zen Master Mazu)

Artificial Zen

“You are luckily all right by yourself, yet you struggle artificially.  Why do you want to put on fetters and go to prison?  You are busy every day claiming to study Zen, learn the Way, and interpret Buddhism, but this alienates you even further.  It is just chasing sound and form.  When will you ever stop?”  - (Zen Master Dazhu)

quotes from ‘Zen Essence - the Science of Freedom’ translated by Thomas Cleary

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 October 2006 03:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  177
Joined  2005-03-12

Unsmoked,

  My point is how do you know so much about other people who meditate? Do you meditate, have you ever been to Sesshin or a Vipassana retreat? Do you have friends who meditate? Or are you just making wild assumptions based on something that you have read? In my experience more people delude themselves by reading spiritual books and thinking they’ve ‘gotten it’ than by meditating. Reading spiritual books has it’s uses, however it can also be used as a way of avoiding the difficult practice of meditation. Just like with the Bible you can find passages to support any point of view, meditate-don’t meditate, get Enlightened-already Enlightened. Any activity, meditating, reading, making charitable donations, can be used by the ego to fortify itself.
  You asked people in Japan if they were interested in Zen, ask people in America the same question and you will most likely get the same answer. The bottom line is this, regardless of whether you ‘understand’ or not, how much of your moment to moment life is spent ‘here’ and how much is spent lost in thought about some other time or place? If you are satisfied with where you are that’s fine. Meditation is ultimately about getting ‘here’ and resting with ‘what is’ and having an undisciplined mind makes that impossible.

 Signature 

“Every minute we spend oblivious to the value of a minute is a minute of unconsciousness. This isn’t some screwball scheme to latch onto the present moment in time, it’s simply what it means to be awake.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 October 2006 04:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1377
Joined  2004-12-21

quotes from ‘Zen Essence - the Science of Freedom’ translated by Thomas Cleary

Yes, unsmoked, I have that little book too.  The first couple of years I had it, I went around quoting it & trying to convince myself and others I “had it.”

My experience is, it don’t work that way.  JustThis is absolutly correct, at least my experience tells me so.  Meditation is a difficult but simple path.  I wish you well, and hope you will try it.  To friends who wish perhaps to begin a meditation practice, I reccomend a couple of little books that headed me in the right direction:

“The Key, and the Name of the Key is Willingness,” and “Nothing Happens Next.”  Both are by Cheri Huber, and available at

 

I meditate to get “here.”  If you have an opportunity to attend a retreat early in your practice, I reccomend you try to do so.  It will help start you in the right direction, and perhaps keep you from starting bad habits.

Good luck!

Edited to correct wrong book title

 Signature 

http://powerlessnolonger.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 October 2006 06:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

“The obstruction of the Path by the mind and its conceptual discrimination is worse than poisonous snakes or fierce tigers.  Why?  Because poisonous snakes and fierce tigers can still be avoided, whereas intelligent people make the mind’s conceptual discrimination their home, so that there’s never a single instant, whether they’re walking, standing, sitting, or lying down, that they’re not having dealings with it.  As time goes on, unknowing and unawares they become one piece with it - and not because they want to, either, but because since beginningless time they have followed this one little road until it’s become set and familiar.  Though they may see through it for a moment and wish to detach from it, they still can’t.  Thus it is said that poisonous snakes and fierce tigers can still be avoided, but the mind’s conceptual discrimination truly has no place for you to escape.”

from ‘Swampland Flowers - the letters and lectures of Zen Master Ta Hui’
translated by J.C. Cleary

Now that the fall rains are here, the orange salamanders are coming out of the swampland and heading up into the woods.  They’ll spend the winter under leaves and old logs.  On the trail, you have to watch your step.

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 October 2006 01:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  177
Joined  2005-03-12

Unsmoked,

  It is rather ironic that you continually quote Rinzai Zenmasters. Reading the books of masters overlooks the fact that the insights which they speak of were the result of long hours of meditation, hours spent dealing with boredom, sleepiness, restlessness and physical pain. Rinzai is one of the more demanding forms of Buddhism, the meditation retreats are on the militaristic side with a definite flavor of tough love (emphasis on tough). Rinzai also emphasizes koan training which requires great efforts in concentration, “Mu, Mu, what is Mu?” 24/7.

  It an historical fact that Ta Hui once had all the available copies of his master’s work, the Blue Cliff Record, collected and burned when he saw that his students clung to the words of the text rather than concern themselves with the immediate experience of his master’s dharma teaching.

I started reading books about Buddhism in the late 60’s so it took me almost 10 years before I got serious, sucked it up and attended a retreat.
For a long time it was a love-hate relationship. I anxiously looked forward to going, for me there was always a slight underlying fear of the unknown or maybe ‘losing my mind’, but by the end of a retreat I couldn’t wait to escape. Then retreats became a strange combination of boredom and bliss. The underlying anxiety is still there but retreat time is now the thing that I value most in my life, next to my wife and kids that is.

 Signature 

“Every minute we spend oblivious to the value of a minute is a minute of unconsciousness. This isn’t some screwball scheme to latch onto the present moment in time, it’s simply what it means to be awake.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 October 2006 08:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

JustThis,

You mention that Zen retreats, or Dai Seshins (?) are events that you value most next to wife and children.  If you don’t mind discussing it, how does the meditation experience at such times differ from meditation in your usual daily life?  Do you feel that meditation is enhanced by peace and quiet?  Support of the group?  Association with a Zen master, or respected teacher?  Feeling of gradual progress? 

In your everyday life, do you catch yourself in the usual round of habitual thinking, (stewing), and at such times are you able, without effort, to discontinue habitual thinking and ‘bask’ unperturbed (but aware and responsive) in whatever is going on around you?  Like Ta Hui with the Blue Cliff Record, are you able to ‘burn’ everything you know about Zen and be happily alone and empty, knowing nothing?  (no longer in the realm of understanding, or not understanding - just trusting what is active within you).

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2006 04:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  177
Joined  2005-03-12

Unsmoked,

  My practice is based on the Theravadin tradition, it is known as Vipassana or Insight meditation. I doubt if my practice falls within the strict definition of traditional Vipassana practice. What I know of Zen comes from friends who practice in that tradition. I always thought that Zen was too demanding or authoritative for me but there are wide variations depending upon the style. Vipassana is rather laid back, the teachers are considered more like guides than masters. They don’t live at the retreat centers, they come for the retreat then go back to their private lives.

  My early retreats were always very difficult, filled with alternating bouts of boredom, restlessness, sleepiness and great physical pain. Most of this is unavoidable, it is part of training the mind to stay in one place and not go off chasing thoughts of past and future. But interspersed with the hard times were moments of deep peace and quiet joy, these were enough to keep me coming back. Gradually I became less distracted and acquired some skill in learning to navigate my inner spaces. The moments of peace and joy have become more frequent and extended, the difficult times still occur but resistance to them has largely faded, I let them be and when they go they go.

  Last year I did my first self retreat, normally I do group retreats where there are around 70 people in attendance. Complete silence accept for teacher interviews and an evening dharma talk. You alternate sitting and walking meditation starting around 5:30am and ending around 9:00pm, there are breaks for meals and cleanup. The only discipline is what you provide yourself, there is no one taking attendance. Retreats are strange in that even though you are surrounded by other people you are really all alone with yourself. Last year’s self retreat was quite a bit different, there were only 7 other people at the center, you meditated mostly by yourself in your room although there was a hall for group sitttings there was no schedule. No place to go, nothing to do, just pay attention, be present, moment after moment after moment.

  While on retreat it is much easier to get some momentum going, all you do is sit and walk, sit and walk. The mind slowly quiets down, inner silence and peace become more established, although there are still times when the thinking mind regains it’s control and carries you away. Meditation practice at home is a lot more chaotic and each session varies quite a bit, some times you are able to pay attention and the sits are peaceful and some times the thinking mind rules and you are at it’s mercy. Probably the most practical benefit of meditation practice for me is a certain disindentification with the thinking mind. One of the first things that you learn when you start is that you don’t control the thinking mind, it controls you. As humans we are all naive in that we believe that we determine what we think or that somehow we set the agenda for our thoughts, that is so wrong.

 Signature 

“Every minute we spend oblivious to the value of a minute is a minute of unconsciousness. This isn’t some screwball scheme to latch onto the present moment in time, it’s simply what it means to be awake.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2006 06:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1632
Joined  2006-09-23

[quote author=“JustThis”] One of the first things that you learn when you start is that you don’t control the thinking mind, it controls you. As humans we are all naive in that we believe that we determine what we think or that somehow we set the agenda for our thoughts, that is so wrong.

I have been diagnosed with chronic, severe, recurrent depression that does not respond to conventional treatment.  ECT has been suggested but I would prefer not to go down that path.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a nightmare for me, for the reason you give above.  They appear to think that all you have to do is change your thoughts.  I’ve sat in a group where people were breaking down in pain and grief and the therapist would listen and say “That’s great!” and cheerlead some kind of positive thinking.  For instance, one woman told a story of horrendous betrayal and cheating by a former business partner on her first day there, and the therapist told her “That’s great!  You built one business, you can build another!”  It was easy to see from the woman’s response that she didn’t find this response at all helpful.  Personally I would have felt even more upset by the implicit prohibition of my sad feelings and overwhelmed by the gigantic task apparently being suggested. 

I guess the theory is that if you are told the same thing over and over again, you’ll genuinely change your thoughts to the happy “I can build another business!”  Well, maybe you can and maybe you can’t, won’t, or don’t even want to.  Maybe building another business isn’t such a great idea at all.  I doubt the entire approach. 

Meanwhile, dialectical behavioral therapy has been a great help.  On the one hand, go ahead and feel sad and cry.  On the other hand, if you start feeling like you have to go further - for instance like putting a bullet through your head or your business partner’s - you probably want to try some ways of tolerating the distress rather than acting rashly.  (You are given many to try.)  Eventually the tears subside and you can use other methods to deal with the sense of betrayal, loss, sadness, need to replace income, etc.

There is a whole section on mindfulness which includes meditation training.  The creator of DBT, Marsha Linehan, is said to have a Zen practice although DBT seems to have Vipassana elements as well.

The meditation training people receive in one run through DBT is generally not enough.  I was fortunate to go through an intensive program once with a woman whose own practice was Vipassana and together with that and some outside reading I was able to experience a few things.

Most people, including me, have to repeat DBT a few times because there is a lot to learn and practice is needed.  I’m now to the point where I plan to find a Vipassana community soon.  Being in the Bay Area that shouldn’t be too hard…

...even though I do live in a cave on Mt. Diablo as my profile states.

 Signature 

“I will tell you with the utmost impudence that I esteem much more his Person, than his Works.”

  (Dryden, St. Euremont’s Essays, 1692.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2006 02:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

made_maka,

Have you seen the film, ‘The Great New Wonderful’?  Your comments above re. therapy sessions made me think you might get some laughs out of it.  Comedian Jim Gaffigan (?) plays the ‘patient’.  Other plots include the exciting life of two body guards of an important foreign dignitary -  the men you see in newsreels who wear dark glasses, neatly pressed suits, and scan the crowd diligently.  Other plots take in the tribulations of high powered business people who design and sell very expensive wedding/birthday cakes to the very wealthy, and a ‘normal’ couple who find themselves parents of a nasty little boy.  Some critics call it the best ‘Post 9/11 film’ to date.  Does your cave have a TV/DVD player?

http://www.greatnewwonderfulthemovie.com/

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2006 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1632
Joined  2006-09-23

[quote author=“unsmoked”]
http://www.greatnewwonderfulthemovie.com/

Thanks for the link!  It reminded me that the movie sounded interesting when it first came out - great cast too - but it had slipped from my, er, radar screen. 

My cave does not have a TV.  Fortunately I am able to play DVDs on my laptop computer, given to me by the same kind strangers who provide food and batteries. 

Somehow I am able to connect to the Internets and the Googles as well.  I believe this is due to a miraculous phenomenon called High Figh or Wigh Figh or something like that.

I am indeed blessed.

 Signature 

“I will tell you with the utmost impudence that I esteem much more his Person, than his Works.”

  (Dryden, St. Euremont’s Essays, 1692.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2006 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

Just This,

In your last post above, you closed by saying, “One of the first things that you learn when you start is that you don’t control the thinking mind, it controls you.  As humans we are all naive in that we believe that we determine what we think or that somehow we set the agenda for our thoughts, that is so wrong.”

When I read this, I get the feeling that you are talking about two entities, namely ‘you’ and a ‘thinker’, and that the ‘thinker’ entity controls the ‘you’ entity.  Am I misinterpreting your meaning?  In Buddhism there is no self apart from the thinker.  In the Dhammapada (the sayings of Buddha), the text reads, “Self is master of self; who else would be the master?  With a self well under control, one gains a master hard to find.”  (the topic being self-mastery).

Another way to look at it is that we ARE our thoughts.  Thought is master of thought.  It is thought that decides to be still, not a separate ‘you’, or ‘I’ or ‘me’ entity.  The ‘I’ is thought.  In Zen, thought looks at its own activity, sees the noise and interference of that activity, and, as an act of intelligence, becomes quiet.  As long as there’s an entity trying to be still, trying to control thought, the illusion continues - the noise continues in a different disguise.

Is it possible for thought to watch itself using energy? - For thought to watch itself using energy in order to make itself quiet? - Watch itself using energy in order to arrive at not using energy?  Watch itself using energy in order to arrive at peace and enlightenment?

If you are using energy (mental effort) to try and grasp or understand Zen, or to try and achieve enlightenment, know that this is the proverbial mosquito trying to bite the iron ball - a futile waste of power.  Is it possible to turn one’s attention inward and see if effort is being applied to something, or if energy is draining because of being ‘stuck’ or ‘blocked’ or ‘puzzled’, or because we want to achieve something we don’t have?

At this moment, everything that is called Truth, Reality, or The Fundamental Ground is ‘shining’ all around, encompassing everything.  This Reality is self-sustaining - it takes no effort on our part to be part of it.  The normal mind can see it, hear it, feel it, smell it, taste it, etc. without effort.  We don’t need to cultivate some special state, or achieve some special level of understanding to arrive at Reality.  The thinking mind, or the self, wants more, of course - and that is its lifelong persuit - to brush Reality aside and reach for something MORE.  (the inner state of desire - which drains power and blinds, or distracts us to from what is here now).  As soon as you are resting calmly here now, at home in the Fundamental Ground, at home in the normal mind - you are no different from all the sages of past and present.  As soon as you find youself saving power, you gain power.  There’s no need for thought to reach for this, or try to control it, or wonder what else there is to know or understand, or how to explain it to other people.

“The Way does not require cultivation - just don’t pollute it.”  (Zen)

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2006 03:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  177
Joined  2005-03-12

Unsmoked,

  Yes, you are misinterpreting my meaning, my last statement refers to people who don’t practice meditation, who haven’t studied their inner landscape. Such people identify themselves with their thoughts. An experienced meditator sees that there is no thinker, only thoughts. In Buddhism the self is an illusion, most certainly it is not ‘the thinker’. In Insight meditation one trains the attention by first focusing it on the breath. When the attention is disciplined one can focus it on any sensory input, sounds, body sensations, tastes, etc. In Buddhism the mind is considered the sixth sense organ, it apprehends mental phenomena, so thoughts can also be observed. The biggest trap that one falls into in meditation is getting sucked into thoughts, losing the present by getting interested and involved in thinking about the past or future. There is nothing wrong with thoughts they are just sensory phenomena appearing and disappearing, the problem is when one follows them.

I don’t know who did the translation of the Dhammapada that you quoted but that statement makes no sense to me at all. Based on what I observe in my practice all your statements about what thought can do are wrong. Thought is that inner voice that mostly chatters away without a whole lot of rhyme or reason combined with images or pictures that relate to whatever subject is being talked about.

 Signature 

“Every minute we spend oblivious to the value of a minute is a minute of unconsciousness. This isn’t some screwball scheme to latch onto the present moment in time, it’s simply what it means to be awake.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2006 04:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1632
Joined  2006-09-23

[quote author=“unsmoked”]
Another way to look at it is that we ARE our thoughts.

Yikes!  If that were true, I’d spend most of my time curled up under my bed sobbing. 

Sorry, that sentence literally scared me for a second.  Not being my thoughts saves my life.

 Signature 

“I will tell you with the utmost impudence that I esteem much more his Person, than his Works.”

  (Dryden, St. Euremont’s Essays, 1692.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2006 05:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2136
Joined  2006-02-20

[quote author=“made_maka”][quote author=“unsmoked”]
Another way to look at it is that we ARE our thoughts.

Yikes!  If that were true, I’d spend most of my time curled up under my bed sobbing. 

Sorry, that sentence literally scared me for a second.  Not being my thoughts saves my life.

In Zen koan practice, a beginner might get the question, “Who are you?”
In some cases this might take ten or twenty years for the person to answer.

We know how a computer ‘thinks’ or recalls data - - - just blips on a CD, or something like that.  In our case, it’s blips in the brain.  In humans, these blips get the idea that they are a ‘central self’, a ‘me.’  That’s what I meant by the sentence, “We ARE our thoughts.” 

In Zen it is said, “If you want to be free, get to know your real self.  It has no form, no appearance, no root, no basis, no abode, but is lively and buoyant.  It responds with versatile facility, but its function cannot be located.  Therefore when you look for it you become further from it, when you seek it you turn away from it all the more.”

Sadly, many people are living like robots.  Instead of responding to life’s challenges with ‘versatile facility’, they respond mechanically, habitually, from their data.  Consider for example the trait of resentment - how it plays a part in so many lives and causes so much misery.  People go to psychiatrists to vent resentment against parents or bosses, or neighbors, or rivals.  We expect some expert to tinker with our data and set us free.  If we only knew that data is only data.  Naturally we don’t want to forget our name, or where we live, but data is only data.

 Signature 

“The simple fables of the religious of the world have come to seem like tales told to children.”  - Nobel Prize recipient - Francis Crick

“It is time we recognized the boundless narcissism and self-deceit of the saved.” - Sam Harris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 October 2006 06:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1632
Joined  2006-09-23

[quote author=“unsmoked”][quote author=“made_maka”]
Sorry, that sentence literally scared me for a second.  Not being my thoughts saves my life.

In Zen koan practice, a beginner might get the question, “Who are you?”
In some cases this might take ten or twenty years for the person to answer.

Sometimes sitting quietly, this: “Who is thinking?” 

Start looking for he/she/it and it can turn into one of those mind-blowing “not-self” experiences.

No claims of mysticism here.  It would be interesting to see an MRI of one’s brain at such moments.

[quote author=“unsmoked”]We know how a computer ‘thinks’ or recalls data - - - just blips on a CD, or something like that.  In our case, it’s blips in the brain.  In humans, these blips get the idea that they are a ‘central self’, a ‘me.’  That’s what I meant by the sentence, “We ARE our thoughts.”

Gotcha, I think. 

I lost the sense of what you were saying when I read that sentence, because it was truly terrifying.  I remember a time when my brain wasn’t running any other idea and it was hellish.

Sadly, many people are living like robots.  Instead of responding to life’s challenges with ‘versatile facility’, they respond mechanically, habitually, from their data.  Consider for example the trait of resentment - how it plays a part in so many lives and causes so much misery.  People go to psychiatrists to vent resentment against parents or bosses, or neighbors, or rivals.  We expect some expert to tinker with our data and set us free.  If we only knew that data is only data.  Naturally we don’t want to forget our name, or where we live, but data is only data.

Yeah, again this is the problem I have with “cognitive behavioral therapy”.  Why exhaust yourself trying to rewrite or rejigger the software.  My husband partly does this for a living.  He spends days tracking down faulty blips and correcting them.  There are other parts of his job he likes, but not that.

Fortunately I don’t have to bother with it.  I can just let it all stream by, messed up or not, I don’t have to run any particular program so the blips can be corrupted and it doesn’t matter.

I like this metaphor.  I’m getting it all wrong probably, but I like it.

“Versatile facility” is good too.  At some point you do have to stop watching the CD whirl around and get a new driver’s license or something less pleasant like that.  I’m getting better and better at performing everyday tasks and still not climbing onto some crappy train of thought and winding up in a slaughterhouse in Texas.

I don’t like that metaphor as much, but - metaphorically speaking - there was a time when my mind was often to be found in just such a spot.  And I didn’t know how to escape.

“This” is still around to be “me” because someone did know how and taught it.

 Signature 

“I will tell you with the utmost impudence that I esteem much more his Person, than his Works.”

  (Dryden, St. Euremont’s Essays, 1692.)

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 4
2
 
RSS 2.0     Atom Feed