I wish I could share Leonard Pitts' optimism
Posted: 13 April 2005 05:22 AM   [ Ignore ]  
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America having second thoughts about influence of religious right (?)

USA Today/CNN/Gallup Poll finds the controversy over Terri Schiavo has raised concerns among many Americans about the moral agenda of the Republican Party and the political power of conservative Christians .

Based upon what I know of the American public, this is probably just a short-sighted (and most likely very temporary) emotional reaction rather than actual realization or a trend toward understanding and appreciating the contrary natures of the religious right wing and freedom/traditional American (constitutional) values.

Byron

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“We say, ‘Love your brother…’ We don’t say it really, but… Well we don’t literally say it. We don’t really, literally mean it. No, we don’t believe it either, but… But that message should be clear.”—David St. Hubbins

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Posted: 13 April 2005 06:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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IMHO, what we need is cable news shows interviewing Europeans who can state their sheer fear of what the Religious Right is doing to the U.S.

You know, having Hollanders stating that even though church attendance is at an all-time low in their country, STDs, teen pregnancies, and drug use are non-issues.

JL

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Posted: 13 April 2005 12:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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Based upon what I know of the American public, this is probably just a short-sighted (and most likely very temporary) emotional reaction rather than actual realization or a trend toward understanding and appreciating the contrary natures of the religious right wing and freedom/traditional American (constitutional) values.

Byron

I disagree which I hope is more than just wishful thinking. I think that the performance put on by the Bush Bros. , DeLay, congress and the religious right are likely to be the beginning of a backlash against the religious conservatives in government.  The Schaivo spectacle is not likely to be the last such event to turn public opinion against the religious right. I see that moderate thinking will gain ground as the these events continue. By the time the 2008 election is upon us, the Republican will put forth a religious moderate as they realize that a religious conservative can not win.
Perhaps I am wrong but this is my storyand I am stickin’ to it. - at least for now.

Stay Well
Wot

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Posted: 13 April 2005 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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[quote author=“Wotansson”]I disagree which I hope is more than just wishful thinking.

I agree with you here. I hope that this is a sign that the pendulum is starting to swing the other way on the radical christian fundamentalists. But these neocons are masters at framing the public debate, i.e. getting the press and the pundits to talk only about the issues they want them to talk about, usually in the exact way they want to talk about them, even to the detriment of the country. They’ll keep winning as long as we always play the game by their rules.

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Posted: 14 April 2005 03:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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And so it continues:

DeLay Seeks Congressional Review of Schiavo Case

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. House of Representatives Majority Leader Tom DeLay, who denounced judges involved in the court battle over Terri Schiavo, said on Wednesday he has requested a congressional review of the brain-damaged woman’s “right-to-die” case.

The House Judiciary Committee could seek to impeach those judges, but that seems highly unlikely as even many of DeLay’s fellow Republicans have voiced opposition to that option.

DeLay, a Texas Republican, declined to say if he believed any of the judges should be impeached but told his weekly news conference, “I’ve asked the Judiciary Committee to look at the case and the actions of the federal judiciary and make their recommendations.”

Recommendations could include legislation on the jurisdiction of federal courts in “right-to-die” cases or, as a likely first step, a hearing on how the courts handled Schiavo. The Florida woman, who suffered severe brain damage 15 years ago, died last month following the court-ordered removal of her feeding tube amid a bitter family dispute.

Several federal courts refused to intervene despite legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush authorizing them to do so.

The House also passed a broader bill, championed by Judiciary chairman James Sensenbrenner, granting federal courts a role in other end-of-life cases, but the Senate rejected the approach of the Wisconsin Republican. Congress settled on a narrowly crafted compromise focusing only on Schiavo.

Shortly after her death, DeLay vowed: “We will look at an arrogant, out of control, unaccountable judiciary that thumbed their nose at the Congress and president when given jurisdiction to hear this case anew.

“The time will come for the men responsible for this to answer for their behavior,” DeLay said.

INDEPENDENT JUDICIARY

DeLay’s remarks drew a mixed response, with many condemning him and others saying the courts needed to be reined in.

On Wednesday, DeLay appeared to address the criticism, saying, “Of course, I believe in an independent judiciary.

“I also recognize, however, that Congress has constitutionally mandated oversight responsibilities over the judiciary,” DeLay added.

“The Schiavo case is highly emotional,” said a Republican lawmaker on the Judiciary Committee who asked not to be named. He said he did not expect the committee to try to impeach any of the judges, but believed hearings would be held “so we could all obtain and exchange more information.”

Last week, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican who helped DeLay push the Schiavo legislation, said he believed the courts “acted in a fair and independent way.”

The Schiavo case increased a political storm around DeLay, who has faced questions for weeks about foreign trips funded by outside groups and other ethics-related matters.

DeLay, who has denied any wrongdoing, declined to take any questions at his news conference on the subject, dismissing it as part of a partisan attack by Democrats and their allies.

In Las Vegas, the president of the newly formed United Steelworkers union—a merger between the United Steelworkers of America and the Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical and Energy Workers International Union—said its top political objective is to unseat DeLay in next year’s elections.

“Kick Tom DeLay’s ass out,” said Leo Gerard, casting the Texas Republican as a foe of organized labor.

Rep. Tom Reynolds of New York, head of the House Republican campaign committee, scoffed at efforts to oust DeLay, saying, “Nothing gives Tom DeLay more strength than a situation where Democrats are foaming at the mouth to defeat him.”

I guess that DeLay is ignoring the polls which indicate the majority of Americans disapprove of the actions of the Bushes and Congress in the Schaivo case. But I suspect that as a “Christian soldier” he really doesn’t care. This should only serve to further cook his goose with the American public. I find his actions to be an outrageous intrusion into the courts by the legistature but I suspected that there would be some retribution coming against the federal judges who ruled courageously (my opinion) in accordance with the law.

Stay Well
Wot

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