Albert Einstein on spirituality religion, and some other stuff
Posted: 04 July 2012 06:17 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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“In their struggle for the ethical good, teachers of religion must have the stature to give up the doctrine of a personal God, that is give up that source of fear and hope which in the past placed such vast power in the hands of priests.  In their labors they will have to avail themselves of those forces which are capable of cultivating the Good, the True, and the Beautiful in humanity itself… The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind faith, but through striving after rational knowledge.  In this sense I believe that the priest must become a teacher if he wishes to do justice to his lofty educational mission”


“In order to form an immaculate member of a flock of sheep one must, above all, be a sheep.”


Everything that the human race has done and thought is concerned with the satisfaction of deeply felt needs and the assuagement of pain.  One has to keep this constantly in mind if one wishes to understand spiritual movements and their development.  Feeling and longing are the motive force behind all human endeavor and human creation… In this sense I am speaking of a religion of fear.  This, though not created, is in an important degree stabilized by the portion of a special priestly caste which sets itself up as a mediator between the people and the beings they fear and erects a hegemony on this basis.”


“I cannot conceive of a god who rewards and punishes his creatures or has a will of the kind that we experience in ourselves.  Neither can I – nor would I want to – conceive of an individual that survives his physical death.  Let feeble souls, from fear or absurd egotism, cherish such thoughts.  I am satisfied with the mystery of the eternity of life and a glimpse of the marvelous structure of the existing world, together with the devoted striving to comprehend a portion, be it ever so tiny of the Reason that manifests itself in nature.” 


“The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation cannot for a moment entertain the idea of a being who interferes in the course of events… He has no use for the religion of fear and equally little for social or moral religion.  A God who rewards and punishes is inconceivable to him for the simple reason that man’s actions are determined by necessity, external and internal, so that in God’s eyes he cannot be responsible, any more than an inanimate object is responsible for the motions it undergoes.  Science has therefore been charged with undermining morality, but the charge is unjust.  A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary.  Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death.”


“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.  It is the source of all true art and all science.  He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.”


“Small is the number of them that see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts.”


“You see, wire telegraph is a kind of a very, very long cat.  You pull his tail in New York and his head is meowing in Los Angeles.  Do you understand this? And radio operates exactly the same way: you send signals here, they receive them there.  The only difference is that there is no cat.”


What is the meaning of human life, or for that matter, of the life of any creature?  To know an answer to this question means to be religious.  You ask: Does it make any sense, then, to pose this question?  I answer: The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.”


“Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment.  Most people are even incapable of forming such opinion.”


“Now he has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me.  That means nothing.  People like us, who believe in physics, know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”


“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the universe.”


“A human being is part of a whole, called by us – universe – a part limited in time and space.  He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.  This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.  Our task must be to free ourselves from the prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”


Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts (sign hanging in Einstein’s office at Princeton.)


“Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

 

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Posted: 04 July 2012 10:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Wreck of M Deare - 04 July 2012 06:17 PM

“In their struggle for the ethical good, teachers of religion must have the stature to give up the doctrine of a personal God, that is give up that source of fear and hope which in the past placed such vast power in the hands of priests.  In their labors they will have to avail themselves of those forces which are capable of cultivating the Good, the True, and the Beautiful in humanity itself… The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind faith, but through striving after rational knowledge.  In this sense I believe that the priest must become a teacher if he wishes to do justice to his lofty educational mission”


“In order to form an immaculate member of a flock of sheep one must, above all, be a sheep.”


Everything that the human race has done and thought is concerned with the satisfaction of deeply felt needs and the assuagement of pain.  One has to keep this constantly in mind if one wishes to understand spiritual movements and their development.  Feeling and longing are the motive force behind all human endeavor and human creation… In this sense I am speaking of a religion of fear.  This, though not created, is in an important degree stabilized by the portion of a special priestly caste which sets itself up as a mediator between the people and the beings they fear and erects a hegemony on this basis.”


“I cannot conceive of a god who rewards and punishes his creatures or has a will of the kind that we experience in ourselves.  Neither can I – nor would I want to – conceive of an individual that survives his physical death.  Let feeble souls, from fear or absurd egotism, cherish such thoughts.  I am satisfied with the mystery of the eternity of life and a glimpse of the marvelous structure of the existing world, together with the devoted striving to comprehend a portion, be it ever so tiny of the Reason that manifests itself in nature.” 


“The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation cannot for a moment entertain the idea of a being who interferes in the course of events… He has no use for the religion of fear and equally little for social or moral religion.  A God who rewards and punishes is inconceivable to him for the simple reason that man’s actions are determined by necessity, external and internal, so that in God’s eyes he cannot be responsible, any more than an inanimate object is responsible for the motions it undergoes.  Science has therefore been charged with undermining morality, but the charge is unjust.  A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary.  Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death.”


“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.  It is the source of all true art and all science.  He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.”


“Small is the number of them that see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts.”


“You see, wire telegraph is a kind of a very, very long cat.  You pull his tail in New York and his head is meowing in Los Angeles.  Do you understand this? And radio operates exactly the same way: you send signals here, they receive them there.  The only difference is that there is no cat.”


What is the meaning of human life, or for that matter, of the life of any creature?  To know an answer to this question means to be religious.  You ask: Does it make any sense, then, to pose this question?  I answer: The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.”


“Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment.  Most people are even incapable of forming such opinion.”


“Now he has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me.  That means nothing.  People like us, who believe in physics, know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”


“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the universe.”


“A human being is part of a whole, called by us – universe – a part limited in time and space.  He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.  This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.  Our task must be to free ourselves from the prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”


Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts (sign hanging in Einstein’s office at Princeton.)


“Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

 

 

Albert was undoubtedly brilliant in mathematics and physics.
I can’t imagine why he would bother to have opinions on spiritual matters any more than he would ponder the reality of unicorns.

 

 

 

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Posted: 05 July 2012 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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Wreck of M Deare - 04 July 2012 06:17 PM

“In their struggle for the ethical good, teachers of religion must have the stature to give up the doctrine of a personal God, that is give up that source of fear and hope which in the past placed such vast power in the hands of priests.  In their labors they will have to avail themselves of those forces which are capable of cultivating the Good, the True, and the Beautiful in humanity itself… The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind faith, but through striving after rational knowledge.  In this sense I believe that the priest must become a teacher if he wishes to do justice to his lofty educational mission”

 

The goal of cultivating the Good, the True, and The Beautiful is merely another facet of the conceptual mind;s attempt to feather its own bed.
It arises from the same needs that cultivate all religious thought.

 

“In order to form an immaculate member of a flock of sheep one must, above all, be a sheep.”

 


Only sheep dream of becoming something other than sheep.

 

 

Everything that the human race has done and thought is concerned with the satisfaction of deeply felt needs and the assuagement of pain.  One has to keep this constantly in mind if one wishes to understand spiritual movements and their development.  Feeling and longing are the motive force behind all human endeavor and human creation… In this sense I am speaking of a religion of fear.  This, though not created, is in an important degree stabilized by the portion of a special priestly caste which sets itself up as a mediator between the people and the beings they fear and erects a hegemony on this basis.”

In this sense, the study of science is no different than religion.
The conceptual mind is driven to soothe itself in both disciplines.

 

 

“The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation cannot for a moment entertain the idea of a being who interferes in the course of events… He has no use for the religion of fear and equally little for social or moral religion.  A God who rewards and punishes is inconceivable to him for the simple reason that man’s actions are determined by necessity, external and internal, so that in God’s eyes he cannot be responsible, any more than an inanimate object is responsible for the motions it undergoes.  Science has therefore been charged with undermining morality, but the charge is unjust.  A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary.  Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death.”

If man’s actions ” are determined by necessity, external and internal”, he doesn’t have the choice to base his behavior on “sympathy, education and social ties and needs”.

 


“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.  It is the source of all true art and all science.  He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.”

 

The conceptual minds sense of self is confined to is own objectified overlay.
It cannot open its eyes to any other reality.

 

 

 

What is the meaning of human life, or for that matter, of the life of any creature?  To know an answer to this question means to be religious.  You ask: Does it make any sense, then, to pose this question?  I answer: The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.”

 


“Meaning” and “meaningless” are relevant only to the pseudo-reality created by the mind of man.

 

“Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment.  Most people are even incapable of forming such opinion.”


A box cannot think outside of itself.

“Now he has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me.  That means nothing.  People like us, who believe in physics, know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”


“People like us” is an illusion

 

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the universe.”

 

Factor out choice and the word “stupid” becomes meaningless.

 

 

“A human being is part of a whole, called by us – universe – a part limited in time and space.  He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.  This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.  Our task must be to free ourselves from the prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

 

Baloney.
What he suggests qualifies as another religion.

 

 

Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts (sign hanging in Einstein’s office at Princeton.)


Double talk babble.


“Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

 

 


The word “reality” is a label designed to encompass the totality of the conceptual mind’s conceptual overlay.
He is calling an illusion an illusion.
Albert had a great scientific mind.
But that does not qualify him to comment on the nature of the imaginary world that arises in the mind of man.

[ Edited: 05 July 2012 10:44 AM by toombaru]
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