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Self-STICKY thread: plan of action for atheism in U.S.
Posted: 23 December 2004 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]  
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Please keep this thread related to steps as part of a plan of action to promote atheism/reason (or crush religion, take your pick).
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I think protesting against any religious stuff on public property (especially Xmas) will not help one bit.

Think about it.  If the RR ever totally controlled gov't they'd be able to install any religion as their favorite.  However, as long as freedom of speech (unabridged) is around they have a problem.

1) I think the biggest way to get the debate going (all the while having nothing to do with legislation or protesting legislation or protesting gov't) is to stand around churches on Sunday with various prior resurrected gods hanging on a cross with the name of the "eventual resurrectee" like Mithras or Osiris (Osiris is the best choice).

Every Sunday going to church, the attendees would have to see it.  Sunday after Sunday.

2) I would like to put together a typical 12-month calendar whereby the large pictures for each month are anti-monotheism but in a roundabout way.  For example, December's picture would be a flood of meteorites shown in the sky descending to earth.  Another month could have the Egyptian pyramids against a backdrop of meteorites.  IOW, people would see the calendar, not realize what it's true purpose of, but possibly be interested in the pictures for each month.

JL

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Posted: 28 December 2004 11:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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my suggestion is for clear-headed parents and volunteers to teach their children to be free spirits and to think on their own, to question everything and to apply the SCIENTIFIC METHOD to find answers - that could improve the chances for a brighter future for all and ease out the RR

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Posted: 28 December 2004 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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[quote author=“fjlomnix”]my suggestion is for clear-headed parents and volunteers to teach their children to be free spirits and to think on their own, to question everything and to apply the SCIENTIFIC METHOD to find answers - that could improve the chances for a brighter future for all and ease out the RR

The method for the discovery of truth is analytic and consists of four rules:

Accept nothing as true except what can be clearly perceived to be so
and accept nothing as true unless one cannot have occasion to doubt it.

Divide up each problem into as many parts as possible and resolve each in the best manner possible.

Carry on one’s reflections in due order; beginning with the most simple
and proceed little by little, or by degrees, to knowledge of the most complex.

Make enumerations so complete and reviews so general that one can be certain of omitting nothing.


Good sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed; for every one thinks himself so abundantly provided with it, that those even who are the most difficult to satisfy in everything else, do not usually desire a larger measure of this quality than they already possess.

It is not likely that all are mistaken the conviction it is rather to be held as testifying that the power of judging aright and of distinguishing truth from error, which is properly what is called good sense or reason, is by nature equal in all men; and that the diversity of our opinions, consequently, does not arise from some being endowed with a larger share of reason than others, but solely from this, that we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects.

For to be possessed of a vigorous mind is not enough; the prime requisite is rightly to apply it. He truly engages in battle who endeavors to surmount all the difficulties and errors which prevent him from reaching the knowledge of truth.

I hold in esteem the studies of the schools. I was aware that the languages taught in them are necessary to the understanding of the writings of the ancients; that the grace of fable stirs the mind; that the memorable deeds of history elevate it; and, if read with discretion, aid in forming the judgment; that the perusal of all excellent books is to interview with the noblest men of past ages and in which are discovered only their choicest thoughts; that eloquence has incomparable force and beauty; that poetry has its ravishing graces and delights; that in the mathematics there are many refined discoveries eminently suited to gratify the inquisitive, as well as further all the arts an lessen the labor of man; that numerous highly useful precepts and exhortations to virtue are contained in treatises on morals; that theology points out the path to heaven; that philosophy affords the means of discoursing with an appearance of truth on all matters, and commands the admiration of the more simple; that jurisprudence, medicine, and the other sciences, secure for their cultivators honors and bestow some attention upon all, even upon those abounding the most in superstition and error, that we may be in a position to determine their real value, and guard against being deceived.

I am not at all astonished at the extravagances attributed to those ancient philosophers whose own writings we do not possess; whose thoughts, however, I do not on that account suppose to have been really absurd, seeing they were among the ablest men of their times, but only that these have been falsely represented to us.

I am quite sure that the most devoted of the present followers of Aristotle would think themselves happy if they had as much knowledge of nature as he possessed.

I never accepted anything for true which I did not clearly know to be such; that is to say, carefully to avoid precipitancy and prejudice, and to comprise nothing more in my judgement than what was presented to my mind so clearly and distinctly as to exclude all ground of doubt.

I divide each of the difficulties under examination into as many parts as possible, and as might be necessary for its adequate solution. I resolved to conduct my thoughts in such order that, by commencing with objects the simplest and easiest to know, I might ascend by little and little, and, as it were, step by step, to the knowledge of the more complex; in accustoming my mind to the love and nourishment of truth, and to a distaste for all such reasoning as were false.

The long chains of simple and easy reasoning by means of which geometers are accustomed to reach the conclusions of their most difficult demonstrations, had led me to envision that all things, to the knowledge of which man is competent, are mutually connected in the same way, and that there is nothing so far removed from us as to be beyond our reach, or so hidden that we cannot discover it, provided only we abstain from accepting the false for the true, and always preserve in our thoughts the order necessary for the deduction of one truth from another.

Each truth discovered was a rule available in the discovery of subsequent ones.

Expediency seemed to dictate that I should regulate my practice conformably to the opinions of those with whom I should have to live; and it appeared to me that, in order to ascertain the real opinions of such, I ought rather to take cognizance of what they practiced rather than of what they said, not only because, in the corruption of our manners, there are few disposed to speak exactly as they believe, but also because very many are not aware of what it is that they really believe; for, as the act of mind by which a thing is believed is different from that by which we know that we believe it, the one act is often found without the other.

When it is not in our power to determine what is true, we ought to act according to what is most probable.

I have always endeavored to conquer myself rather than fortune, and change my desires rather than the order of the Earth, and in general, accustom myself to the persuasion that, except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.

If we consider all real objects as equally beyond our power, we shall no more regret the absence of such real objects as seem due at birth, when deprived of them without any fault of our own.

I may state that it was my conviction that I could not do better than continue in that in which I was engaged, viz., in devoting my whole life to the culture of my reason, and in making the greatest progress Iwas able in the knowledge of truth.

I attentively examined what I was.

I observed that I could envision that I had no body, and that there was no Earth nor any place in which I might be, but I could not envision that I was not; for I still was and that, on the contrary, from the very circumstance that I thought to doubt the truth of other things, it most clearly and certainly followed that I was; while, on the other hand, if I had only ceased to think, although all the other objects which I had ever envisioned had been in reality existent, I would have had no reason to believe that I existed.

I thence concluded that I was a substance whose whole essence or nature consists only in thinking, and which, that it may exist, has no need of place, nor is dependent on anything real .

“I,” that is to say, the mind by which I am what I am, is wholly distinct from the body, and is even more easily known than the body, and is such, that although the body were not, it would still continue to be all that it is.

I think, therefore I am.

Although I might think that I was dreaming, and that all which I saw or imagined was false, I could not, nevertheless, deny that the ideas were in reality in my thoughts.

I was disposed straightway to search for other truths.

I perceived that there was nothing at all in these demonstrations which could assure me of the existence of their object: thus, for example, supposing a triangle to be given, I distinctly perceived that its three angles were necessarily equal to two right angles, but I did not on that account perceive anything which could assure me that any triangle existed.

The reason which leads many to persuade theirselves that there is a difficulty in knowing this truth, and even also in knowing what their mind really is, is that they never raise their thoughts above real objects, and are so accustomed to consider nothing except by way of imagination, which is a mode of thinking limited to real objects, that all that is not imaginable seems to them not intelligible.

The truth of this is sufficiently manifest from the single circumstance, that the philosophers of the schools accept as a maxim that there is nothing in the understanding which was not previously in the senses, in which however it is certain that the ideas of God and of the soul have never been; and it appears to me that they who make use of their imagination to comprehend these ideas do exactly the same thing as if, in order to hear sounds or smell odors, they strove to avail themselves of their eyes; unless indeed that there is this difference, that the sense of sight does not afford us an inferior assurance to those of smell or hearing; in place of which, neither our imagination nor our senses can give us assurance of anything unless our understanding intervene.

God is or exists because all that we possess is derived from God.

Whence it follows that our ideas or notions, which to the extent of their
clearness and distinctness are real, and proceed from God, must to that extent be true.

Whereas we not infrequently have ideas or notions in which some falsity is contained,
this can only be the case when we proceed from lack of knowledge.

After the knowledge of God and of the soul has rendered us certain,
we can easily understand that the truth of reason we experience when awake,
ought not in the slightest degree to be called in question on account of the illusions of our dreams.

We know that the thoughts which occur in dreaming occur within a false reality.

Whether awake or asleep, we ought never to allow ourselves to be persuaded of the truth of anything unless on the evidence of our reason.

It must be noted that I say of our reason, and not of our imagination.

It is not a dictate of reason that what we thus see or imagine is in reality existent.

I have also observed certain laws established in nature by God, that after we have reflected sufficiently upon these, we can not doubt that they are accurately observed in all that exists or takes place on the Earth and farther, by considering the concatenation of these laws, it appears to me that I have discovered many truths more useful and more important than all I had before learned, or even had expected to learn.

If God were now to create somewhere in the imaginary spaces matter sufficient to compose a universe and were to agitate variously and confusedly the different parts of this matter, so that there resulted a chaos as disordered as the poets ever feigned, and after that did nothing more than lend ordinary concurrence to nature, and allow nature to act in accordance with the laws of nature which God had established, the result, by necessity, would be as our reality is.

I have pointed out what are the laws of nature; and, with no other principle upon which to found my reasoning except the infinite perfection of God, I endeavored to demonstrate all those about which there could be any room for doubt, and to prove that they are such, that even if God had created more worlds, there could have been none in which these laws were not observed.

This is certain, and an opinion commonly received among theologians, that the action by which God now sustains the universe is the same with that by which he originally created it; so that even although God had from the beginning given it no other form than that of chaos, provided only God had established certain laws of nature, and had lent it concurrence to enable it to act as it is wont to do, it may be believed, without discredit to the miracle of creation, that, in this way alone, things purely material might, in course of time, have become such as we observe them at present; and their nature is much more easily envisioned when they are beheld coming in this manner gradually into existence, than when they are only considered as produced at once in a finished and perfect state.

I perceived it to be possible to arrive at knowledge highly useful in life; so natural to our minds that no one can so much as imagine himself ignorant of it; and in light of the speculative philosophy usually taught in the schools, to discover a practical means by which to know the force and action of fire, water, air, the stars, the heavens, and all the other bodies that surround us, as distinctly as we know the various crafts of our artisans, we might also apply them in the same way to all the uses to which they are adapted, and thus render ourselves the lords and possessors of nature.

And this is a result to be desired, not only in order to the invention of an infinity of arts, by which we might be enabled to enjoy without any trouble the fruits of the Earth, and all its comforts, but also and especially for the preservation of health, which is without doubt, of all the blessings of this life, the first and fundamental one.

I examined what were the first and most ordinary effects that could be deduced from these causes; and it appears to me that, in this way, I have found knowledge of the heavens, the stars, and on Earthknowledge of water, air, fire, minerals, and other things which of all others are the most common and simple, and hence the easiest to know.

I have essayed to find general principles, deducing them from certain germs of truths naturally existing in our minds. It is necessary also to confess that the power of nature is so ample and vast, and these principles so simple and general, that I have hardly observed a single particular effect which I cannot at once recognize as capable of being deduced by mankind.

Thereupon, turning over in my mind, the real objects that had ever been presented to my senses I freely venture to state that I have never observed any which I could not satisfactorily explain by the laws of nature.

I am confident that there is no one, even among those whose profession it is, who does not admit that all that is presently known is almost nothing in comparison of what remains to be discovered.

I incite men of superior genius to strive to proceed farther, by contributing, each according to his inclination and ability, to the necessary experiments, and also by informing the public of all they might discover, so that, by the last beginning where those before them had left off, and thus connecting the lives and labors of many, we might collectively proceed much farther than each by himself could do.

I am now in a position to discern, as I think, with sufficient clearness what course must be taken to make the majority of those experiments which may conduce to this end: but I perceive likewise that they are such and so numerous, that neither my hands nor my income, though it were a thousand times larger than it is, would be sufficient for them all; so that according as henceforward I shall have the means of making more or fewer experiments, I shall in the same proportion make greater or less progress in the knowledge of nature.

I had hoped to make known the treatise I had written, and so clearly to exhibit the advantage that would thence accrue to mankind, as to induce all who have the common good of man at heart, that is, all who are virtuous in truth, and not merely in appearance, or according to opinion, as well to communicate to me the experiments they had already made, as to assist me in those that remain to be made.

I neither have so high an opinion of myself as to be willing to make promise of anything extraordinary, nor feed on imaginations so vain as to fancy that the public must be much interested in my designs.

If I were to publish the principles of my philosophy: for although they are almost all so evident that to assent to them no more is needed than simply to understand them, and although there is not one of them of which I do not expect to be able to give demonstration, yet, as it is impossible that they can be in accordance with all the diverse opinions of others, I foresee that I should frequently be turned aside from my grand design, on occasion of the opposition which they would be sure to awaken.

I may say that such persons have an interest in my refraining from publishing the principles of the my philosophy; for, since these are of a kind the simplest and most evident, I should, by publishing them, do much the same as if I were to throw open the windows, and allow the light of day to enter.

I resolved by no means to consent to their publication during my lifetime, lest either the oppositions or the controversies to which they might give rise, or even the reputation, such as it might be, which they would acquire for me, should be any occasion of my losing the time that I had set apart for my own inquiries and life.

For though it be true that every one is bound to promote to the extent of his ability the good of others, and that to be useful to no one is really to be worthless, yet it is likewise true that our cares ought to extend beyond the present, and it is good to omit doing what might perhaps bring some profit to the living, when we have in view the accomplishment of other ends that will be of much greater advantage to those yet to be born.

Even superior men have no reason for any great anxiety to know these laws of nature, for if what they desire is to be able to speak of all things, and to acquire a reputation for learning, they will gain their end more easily by remaining satisfied with the appearance of truth, which can be found without much difficulty in all sorts of matters, than by seeking the truth itself which unfolds itself but slowly and obliges us to freely confess our ignorance.

I do not wish to forestall the judgments of others by speaking myself of my writings; but it will gratify me if they be examined, and, to afford the greater inducement to this I request all who may have any objections to make them.

I have resolved to devote what time I may still have to live to no other occupation than that of endeavoring to acquire some knowledge of laws of nature, the reality of the cause is established by the reality of the effect.


If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.

It is not enough to have a good mind.
The main thing is to use it well.
- Rene Descartes, French philosopher and physicist

 

Understanding comes from brief insights into the nature of things. Although such insights are rare and difficult to sustain they allow us to understand the basis of our desires and grant us the virtue to control those desires.

Those who have mastery over their desires will have a healthy reagrd of others as they see them as equally capable of a virtuous will. Those who possess this knowledge of themselves readily come to believe that any other person can have the same knowledge about themselves because this knowledge involves nothing which depends on any thing outside of the self.

Those who have mastery over their desires are self-assured and confident and have mastery over their fear and anger. Contentment through virtue is attained by acceptance of the reality that the only things we actually control are the only things that we should concern ourselves with.

Rene Descartes

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Posted: 29 December 2004 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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[quote author=“fjlomnix”]my suggestion is for clear-headed parents and volunteers to teach their children to be free spirits and to think on their own, to question everything and to apply the SCIENTIFIC METHOD to find answers - that could improve the chances for a brighter future for all and ease out the RR

I agree, education is the most powerful approach.  The harder we push the more resistance will grow on the other side.  If humans are to awaken to the tyranny of the god they created, in some respects, it must be an idea whose time has come.

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Posted: 29 December 2004 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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[quote author=“Solomon11”][quote author=“fjlomnix”]my suggestion is for clear-headed parents and volunteers to teach their children to be free spirits and to think on their own, to question everything and to apply the SCIENTIFIC METHOD to find answers - that could improve the chances for a brighter future for all and ease out the RR

I agree, education is the most powerful approach.  The harder we push the more resistance will grow on the other side.  If humans are to awaken to the tyranny of the god they created, in some respects, it must be an idea whose time has come.

Thank you for understanding the point. Half of the battle is won.

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Posted: 29 December 2004 11:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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I don’t know exactly when we stopped teaching critical thinking in school.

It had to be after I left = p

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Posted: 30 December 2004 12:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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I was implying that PARENTS and VOLUNTEERS teach our children (not only the schools) - that means that concientious parents should learn or re-read the sciences and arts themselves and then teach their children

alternatively, parents can watch and encourage their children to watch PBS, listen to NPR and Pacifica radio, for example; watch educational tv (there is lots of it, e.g., History and discovery channels, and local community college and university programs on local cable or satellite); go to museums, book stores, historic sites; purchase/use a ham radio; use the internet; buy/us a pocket microscope (wonderful one available for $10 at Radio Shack); telescope; science experimenter kits, e.g., chemistry, biology, electronics; wake up early in morning to experience sun rise; study neighborhood plants, architecture, laws, e.g., attend local council sessions and visit nearby jail (see if you can actually get inside to see what is happening); maybe also see sports and performance events once in a while

parents and potential volunteers are very busy with their own work schedules - but see how so many RR parents are destroying the future by teaching the bible in home-schooled education - it’s criminal - concientious parents should also home-school their children, but not eliminate school - rather, concientious parents should involve themselves with their children’s education to supplement it (at least enough to help their children understand their education clearly), or to offer their children a supplemental education by having them participate in non-school events, e.g., scouts/explorers, 4H, extracurricular events/clubs

as these new children of the future enter the mainstream, they will easily overcome the children of the RR in all aspects of life, and will help guarantee the future of this planet - that’s what I believe we can do NOW

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Posted: 31 December 2004 11:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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[quote author=“fjlomnix”]I was implying that PARENTS and VOLUNTEERS teach our children (not only the schools) - that means that concientious parents should learn or re-read the sciences and arts themselves and then teach their children

My brother is a fundamentalist Cristian who basically adheres to the party line. Yet he has taught his daughter critical thinking. I tend to think the problem may be more due to the public school system. George Bush and his ilk would love to change the public school system into one more closely resembling the madrass(sp?).

In the beginning of the 1900’s current educational systems were designed by foundations set up by industrialists to prepare children for their roles in the industrialized factories, business’ and institutions of an industrialized America.

This education prepared children to live by the bell, move through life as if on conveyor belts and, most importantly, to follow instructions mechanically.

This dark tunnel vision of instruction attempts to create a conforming army of mindless human robots with their soul’s corrupted by a split between the highly compartmentalized, contradictory, conflicting thoughts and ideas of specialized mechanized systems and their life as an organic being on an organic Earth.

The descendants of these industrial corporate barons have attempted to create a robust economy for these mindless human robots. Industrial corporations need a never ending stream of “customer service representatives” , “aggressive telemarketing specialists”, “instant food preparation equipment operators” and “procurement and shipping experts”, in other words mindless “factory” workers or mindless human robots.

Our current educational system is obsolete in a time with the waning of the Industrial Age when the preeminence of a nation, a culture or a society is going to depend upon the ability of a culture to be flexible, to be fluid and to be dynamic.

The innovative critical thinking Americans need to guarantee the viability of bright future for American culture is not on the agenda.

Children will rebel against school authorities, against social ethical norms and against society in general if we continue to attempt to teach our children in a mechanical rote manner designed to prepare our children for a life in the factory dominated society.

Lawrence Turner

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Posted: 31 December 2004 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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you know, I have always believed capitalism was the best economic system but now I wonder.

Advertisers don’t want you to think critically, they want you to consume.

Commercials become more and more emotional based, there is a whole line of advertising thinking now to appeal to the “reptilian” brain and circumvent reason to appeal to us on a subconscious level.

We have turned our political process into a marketing game, our lawmakers are prostitutes, we have turned our new services into commercial productions, we throw Darwin to the dogs while we worship the economic equivalent of “survival of the fittest”.

The love of money might very well be the root of all evil.

Here again, I can see a valid point the fundamentalists have about the direction of society, the irony is they join the politcal party that presses this line of thinking the hardest.

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Posted: 31 December 2004 11:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
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My brother is a fundamentalist Cristian who basically adheres to the party line. Yet he has taught his daughter critical thinking.

this seems contradictory and rather incredulous

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Posted: 31 December 2004 12:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
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Lawrence, let us not forget why our technical schools were established (cal-tech, cmu, rutgers, georgia tech, va tech, mit, etc.) - it was to teach our progeny of the tools to succeed in the future - I don’t see anything wrong in that

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Posted: 31 December 2004 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
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Iisbliss said:

you know, I have always believed capitalism was the best economic system but now I wonder.

Advertisers don’t want you to think critically, they want you to consume.

of course they want everyone to consume blindly, or at least consume their product/service - but are we too dumb to know what is good for us, despite the ads?

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Posted: 31 December 2004 12:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
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A number of years (probably a couple or so decades now) I began reading Richard Dawkins.  He impressed me as having the the most cogent understanding of the large question, “How did life begin?”. 

At his most speculative (see “Selfish Genes) Dawkins proposes that memes operate in the world of thought in much the same ways as genes do in the biological world.  For Dawkins religion (or beliefs) are nothing more than viruses that infect rational thought and cause sufferers to believe in things that are proven false in the light of evidence.  Is education, then, a sufficient vaccine against mass delusion?  I’m not so sure.

There is a basic problem here that I am reminded about by one of my colleagues whenever I argue the merits of a scientific inquiry in psychology.  (I am a professor of Psychology - hence my enthusiasm for the subject).  The problem, she points out, is that each one of us (and Sam points this out in his book) is at the mercy of our own construction of reality.  Science, she argues, is nothing more than a construction arising from the same place where most dogmas arise - a belief system.

Anyway, I’m not about to abandon my belief that science can provide a means for analyzing evidence.  It’s just that the construction thing bothers me sometimes…

If anyone doesn’t think that the road to a more enlightened society isn’t going to be a really tough slog, let me tell you about one of my classes this past semester.  I began my discussion of consciousness as I usually do with some quotes from Merlin Donald’s (2001) book “A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness” and within minutes I had near anarchy on my hands.  It seems that the majority of the class had religious beliefs that informed them that evolution was a “myth”.  I couldn’t believe that I was in the 21st century.  I have been teaching this course for nearly two decades and this was the first time that I had a majority of students openly mocking my “evidence”.

Any thoughts?  Are we going backwards here?  Are we losing ground?

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Posted: 31 December 2004 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
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A number of years (probably a couple or so decades now) I began reading Richard Dawkins.  He impressed me as having the the most cogent understanding of the large question, “How did life begin?”. 

At his most speculative (see “Selfish Genes) Dawkins proposes that memes operate in the world of thought in much the same ways as genes do in the biological world.  For Dawkins religion (or beliefs) are nothing more than viruses that infect rational thought and cause sufferers to believe in things that are proven false in the light of evidence.  Is education, then, a sufficient vaccine against mass delusion?  I’m not so sure.

There is a basic problem here that I am reminded about by one of my colleagues whenever I argue the merits of a scientific inquiry in psychology.  (I am a professor of Psychology - hence my enthusiasm for the subject).  The problem, she points out, is that each one of us (and Sam points this out in his book) is at the mercy of our own construction of reality.  Science, she argues, is nothing more than a construction arising from the same place where most dogmas arise - a belief system.

Anyway, I’m not about to abandon my belief that science can provide a means for analyzing evidence.  It’s just that the construction thing bothers me sometimes…

If anyone doesn’t think that the road to a more enlightened society isn’t going to be a really tough slog, let me tell you about one of my classes this past semester.  I began my discussion of consciousness as I usually do with some quotes from Merlin Donald’s (2001) book “A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness” and within minutes I had near anarchy on my hands.  It seems that the majority of the class had religious beliefs that informed them that evolution was a “myth”.  I couldn’t believe that I was in the 21st century.  I have been teaching this course for nearly two decades and this was the first time that I had a majority of students openly mocking my “evidence”.

Any thoughts?  Are we going backwards here?  Are we losing ground?

Barry Cull

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Posted: 01 January 2005 03:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
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[quote author=“Iisbliss”]you know, I have always believed capitalism was the best economic system but now I wonder.

Advertisers don’t want you to think critically, they want you to consume.

Commercials become more and more emotional based, there is a whole line of advertising thinking now to appeal to the “reptilian” brain and circumvent reason to appeal to us on a subconscious level.

We have turned our political process into a marketing game, our lawmakers are prostitutes, we have turned our new services into commercial productions, we throw Darwin to the dogs while we worship the economic equivalent of “survival of the fittest”.

The love of money might very well be the root of all evil.

Here again, I can see a valid point the fundamentalists have about the direction of society, the irony is they join the politcal party that presses this line of thinking the hardest.

***
Remember the movie Minority Report and what it sounded and looked like as Tom Cruise’s character walked around town?

JL

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Posted: 02 January 2005 06:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
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Joined  2004-12-24

[quote author=“Iisbliss”]you know, I have always believed capitalism was the best economic system but now I wonder.

Advertisers don’t want you to think critically, they want you to consume.

Commercials become more and more emotional based, there is a whole line of advertising thinking now to appeal to the “reptilian” brain and circumvent reason to appeal to us on a subconscious level.

We have turned our political process into a marketing game, our lawmakers are prostitutes, we have turned our new services into commercial productions, we throw Darwin to the dogs while we worship the economic equivalent of “survival of the fittest”.

The love of money might very well be the root of all evil.

Here again, I can see a valid point the fundamentalists have about the direction of society, the irony is they join the politcal party that presses this line of thinking the hardest.

This is because they have been dupped. There is a reason why the intellectual centers of the country did not vote for Bush. Clear channel controls over 1100 radio stations in the heartland of America. As well the youth has fled the heartland and as individuals grow older they tend to be less active and think less. New ideas do not go over well in atrophied brains.

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