1 of 2
1
Symptoms of a Cult
Posted: 21 May 2007 12:57 PM   [ Ignore ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2927
Joined  2006-12-17

Here is a list I compiled about 25 years ago on symptoms that a group was a cult.

1. Are members expected to obey the leader without question at all times?

2. Do the group members show a lack of humor?  Are they unable to joke about their membership in the group?

3. If retreats or residential programs, or group living are involved does the food available have a low protein content and a poor nutritional value?

4. Does the group leadership benefit financially while ordinary group members suffer? 

5. Does the group promote an "end of the world" or "something great is about to happen" attitude?

6. Are group members and leadership unwilling to acknowledge the legitimacy of other groups?

7. Is there an "Us against Them" mentality? 

8. Does study within the group involve listening to long repetitive lectures, especially under conditions of physical duress (e.g., tired from physical work, seated for long periods without breaks, run-down from poor diet)? 

9. Is one of the main priorities for group members the recruitment of new members?

10. Do group members describe their reasons for being in the group, and the benefits that membership provides only in vague generalities?

11. Are proported experiences that cannot be described treated as if they had significant spiritual value?

12. Does the group encourage or discourage cult-like behavior in its members?

Every group may exhibit some of these symptoms in greater or lesser degree, and in every group there will be individuals whose psychological make-up is such that they engage in cultish behavior.  Legitimate groups will discourage this.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 May 2007 04:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  63
Joined  2006-10-01

So, do you given it a 4/12 or 8/12 to really be a cult, because every group might have one of these, but not the others? 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 May 2007 06:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2927
Joined  2006-12-17

[quote author=“PurpleKU77”] So, do you given it a 4/12 or 8/12 to really be a cult, because every group might have one of these, but not the others? 

It’s a matter of degree.  Some of them are strong indicators (e.g., poor diet at retreats/workshops), others are less so.  And every group is going to show some of them in some degree just because people tend to cult-like behavior.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 June 2008 10:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  663
Joined  2008-05-22

A cult is a religion without political power. (I heard that quote somewhere)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2008 05:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  47
Joined  2007-01-30

You sort of touch on this in Point 4, but the main characteristic to watch out for is having rules for the followers that either don’t apply or apply in reverse for the leaders, like requiring celibacy or frugality among followers so that the leaders can live lavishly and have all the sex.

Catholicism shows many of the 12 characteristics in your list.  But the priests and hierarchy follow just about every important rule for the laity, and then some.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 June 2008 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1639
Joined  2007-12-20

Some of these could apply not only to religious groups, but governments as well (i.e. North Korea) or a theocracy.

And with a slight stretch, even our own government (under GWB.)

 Signature 

“Every war is a war against children.”
Howard Zinn

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 June 2008 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2492
Joined  2008-04-05

Absolutist mentality. 2 is company, 3 is a crowd and 4 or more is a cult. grin

 Signature 

‘Every reflecting mind must acknowledge that there is no proof of the existence of a Deity’

‘If ignorance of nature gave birth to gods, knowledge of nature destroys them’

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 June 2008 01:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  585
Joined  2007-10-11
burt - 21 May 2007 04:57 PM

Here is a list I compiled about 25 years ago on symptoms that a group was a cult.

1. Are members expected to obey the leader without question at all times?

2. Do the group members show a lack of humor?  Are they unable to joke about their membership in the group?

3. If retreats or residential programs, or group living are involved does the food available have a low protein content and a poor nutritional value?

4. Does the group leadership benefit financially while ordinary group members suffer? 

5. Does the group promote an "end of the world" or "something great is about to happen" attitude?

6. Are group members and leadership unwilling to acknowledge the legitimacy of other groups?

7. Is there an "Us against Them" mentality? 

8. Does study within the group involve listening to long repetitive lectures, especially under conditions of physical duress (e.g., tired from physical work, seated for long periods without breaks, run-down from poor diet)? 

9. Is one of the main priorities for group members the recruitment of new members?

10. Do group members describe their reasons for being in the group, and the benefits that membership provides only in vague generalities?

11. Are proported experiences that cannot be described treated as if they had significant spiritual value?

12. Does the group encourage or discourage cult-like behavior in its members?

Every group may exhibit some of these symptoms in greater or lesser degree, and in every group there will be individuals whose psychological make-up is such that they engage in cultish behavior.  Legitimate groups will discourage this.


Burt, don’t take this as a criticism, but have you come by your conclusions about cults from actually been involved in one yourself ? You sound like you may be very bothered by the tendancy to confuse cults with religions , and there really should be some viable points one can check out to disern how to separate a cult from something else like it.
One thing though : not all “cults” bear the same earmarks you mentioned.  How about Scientology ( sp?)—is it a cult or a religion ?

What about Freemasonry ? This orginization seems to really stimulate a conflict of opinions. It would be interesting to know how you see it. It may be an example of how general society thinks about the subject.

How about the Latter Day Saints ? Thier doctrine is wayyy out, so to speak, and many people used to believe they were a cult. I’m still reluctant to call it a religion ; it is just a weird offshoot of the Chrstian bible . It’s a distortion

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 June 2008 08:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2927
Joined  2006-12-17
Dee - 18 June 2008 05:23 AM
burt - 21 May 2007 04:57 PM

Here is a list I compiled about 25 years ago on symptoms that a group was a cult.

1. Are members expected to obey the leader without question at all times?

2. Do the group members show a lack of humor?  Are they unable to joke about their membership in the group?

3. If retreats or residential programs, or group living are involved does the food available have a low protein content and a poor nutritional value?

4. Does the group leadership benefit financially while ordinary group members suffer? 

5. Does the group promote an "end of the world" or "something great is about to happen" attitude?

6. Are group members and leadership unwilling to acknowledge the legitimacy of other groups?

7. Is there an "Us against Them" mentality? 

8. Does study within the group involve listening to long repetitive lectures, especially under conditions of physical duress (e.g., tired from physical work, seated for long periods without breaks, run-down from poor diet)? 

9. Is one of the main priorities for group members the recruitment of new members?

10. Do group members describe their reasons for being in the group, and the benefits that membership provides only in vague generalities?

11. Are proported experiences that cannot be described treated as if they had significant spiritual value?

12. Does the group encourage or discourage cult-like behavior in its members?

Every group may exhibit some of these symptoms in greater or lesser degree, and in every group there will be individuals whose psychological make-up is such that they engage in cultish behavior.  Legitimate groups will discourage this.


Burt, don’t take this as a criticism, but have you come by your conclusions about cults from actually been involved in one yourself ? You sound like you may be very bothered by the tendancy to confuse cults with religions , and there really should be some viable points one can check out to disern how to separate a cult from something else like it.
One thing though : not all “cults” bear the same earmarks you mentioned.  How about Scientology ( sp?)—is it a cult or a religion ?

What about Freemasonry ? This orginization seems to really stimulate a conflict of opinions. It would be interesting to know how you see it. It may be an example of how general society thinks about the subject.

How about the Latter Day Saints ? Thier doctrine is wayyy out, so to speak, and many people used to believe they were a cult. I’m still reluctant to call it a religion ; it is just a weird offshoot of the Chrstian bible . It’s a distortion

I haven’t been involved in what I would consider a cult, although back in the lat 70s I would occasionally go to introductory meetings and such of various groups and observe how they presented themselves.  I’ve also been involved in groups where cult-like behavior appeared, but was strongly discouraged.  The problem is that any group of people who get together for a purpose of self-development are going to experience cult symptoms—the issue is how these are handled, are they encouraged to grow, or simply acknowledged as part of the process and not given any power.  I put that list together for a group called something like Society Against Mind Abuse (if I recall) that was forming and, to my view, taking on some cult-like aspects itself while at the same time making blanket condemnations of some groups that I didn’t consider cults.

I don’t have enough information about Scientology, although it appears to be a cult.  The religion aspect was taken on to avoid paying taxes.  There are shades of grey, though, between cults and religions (think of cult as coming from cultivation, as a system that seeks to cultivate certain forms of human behavior and development).  A very good book that makes the distinction is The Sentimental Agents in the Volyan Empire, by Doris Lessing (a very sharp and funny, when not painful, satire).  In one scene she has one of the characters say to another (referring to a cult) “But their methods are almost the same as ours.”  The other character replies, “Yes, but with us, you chose.”  As for Freemasons, certain lodges may fall into cult-like behavior, but in general, as far as I can tell (I’m not a Mason) they have (and continue to have) a very positive influence on society.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 June 2008 12:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  585
Joined  2007-10-11
burt - 18 June 2008 12:25 PM
Dee - 18 June 2008 05:23 AM
burt - 21 May 2007 04:57 PM

Here is a list I compiled about 25 years ago on symptoms that a group was a cult.

1. Are members expected to obey the leader without question at all times?

2. Do the group members show a lack of humor?  Are they unable to joke about their membership in the group?

3. If retreats or residential programs, or group living are involved does the food available have a low protein content and a poor nutritional value?

4. Does the group leadership benefit financially while ordinary group members suffer? 

5. Does the group promote an "end of the world" or "something great is about to happen" attitude?

6. Are group members and leadership unwilling to acknowledge the legitimacy of other groups?

7. Is there an "Us against Them" mentality? 

8. Does study within the group involve listening to long repetitive lectures, especially under conditions of physical duress (e.g., tired from physical work, seated for long periods without breaks, run-down from poor diet)? 

9. Is one of the main priorities for group members the recruitment of new members?

10. Do group members describe their reasons for being in the group, and the benefits that membership provides only in vague generalities?

11. Are proported experiences that cannot be described treated as if they had significant spiritual value?

12. Does the group encourage or discourage cult-like behavior in its members?

Every group may exhibit some of these symptoms in greater or lesser degree, and in every group there will be individuals whose psychological make-up is such that they engage in cultish behavior.  Legitimate groups will discourage this.


Burt, don’t take this as a criticism, but have you come by your conclusions about cults from actually been involved in one yourself ? You sound like you may be very bothered by the tendancy to confuse cults with religions , and there really should be some viable points one can check out to disern how to separate a cult from something else like it.
One thing though : not all “cults” bear the same earmarks you mentioned.  How about Scientology ( sp?)—is it a cult or a religion ?

What about Freemasonry ? This orginization seems to really stimulate a conflict of opinions. It would be interesting to know how you see it. It may be an example of how general society thinks about the subject.

How about the Latter Day Saints ? Thier doctrine is wayyy out, so to speak, and many people used to believe they were a cult. I’m still reluctant to call it a religion ; it is just a weird offshoot of the Chrstian bible . It’s a distortion

I haven’t been involved in what I would consider a cult, although back in the lat 70s I would occasionally go to introductory meetings and such of various groups and observe how they presented themselves.  I’ve also been involved in groups where cult-like behavior appeared, but was strongly discouraged.  The problem is that any group of people who get together for a purpose of self-development are going to experience cult symptoms—the issue is how these are handled, are they encouraged to grow, or simply acknowledged as part of the process and not given any power.  I put that list together for a group called something like Society Against Mind Abuse (if I recall) that was forming and, to my view, taking on some cult-like aspects itself while at the same time making blanket condemnations of some groups that I didn’t consider cults.

I don’t have enough information about Scientology, although it appears to be a cult.  The religion aspect was taken on to avoid paying taxes.  There are shades of grey, though, between cults and religions (think of cult as coming from cultivation, as a system that seeks to cultivate certain forms of human behavior and development).  A very good book that makes the distinction is The Sentimental Agents in the Volyan Empire, by Doris Lessing (a very sharp and funny, when not painful, satire).  In one scene she has one of the characters say to another (referring to a cult) “But their methods are almost the same as ours.”  The other character replies, “Yes, but with us, you chose.”  As for Freemasons, certain lodges may fall into cult-like behavior, but in general, as far as I can tell (I’m not a Mason) they have (and continue to have) a very positive influence on society.

So Scientology was presented as a religion to avoid paying taxes ? I don’t know, but I do know L. Ron Hubbard was as screwy as they come- he insisted he had visited Heaven ( and he found the “gates “( ya ! those ” Golden Gates) “well done, well built “. As a matter of fact he claimed to have have been there twice. The first time he came back describing heaven as having many marble statues and well-manicured landscapes (” like the Bush Gardens ” )and , sadly enough, all those arty things had “deteriorated ” when he saw it the last time. People believed that crap. It’s hard to believe a supposedly smart, talented and ultra-sucessful famous person like Tom Cruise would really accept it as the truth. That goes to show us how religion has the power to make fools of even the elite in society. Brains don’t seem to help a person who WANTS to believe. I hate to say this, but I can’t resist—: ..I can’t help but think of Barack Obama and how he seems to have cast a spell on so much of this country’s voters ( or even non-voters ! ), not because what he teaches is so extraordinary etc. , but because people WANT to see him as unusually fantastic. The whole idea of having someone like him in the oval office has got thier hearts beating and thier feelings fed ,and thier brains taking a nap. Sorry if you are a Obama supporter ! That’s just the way I see it. Seems like a good analogy to me.

Well, I got off-track- please excuse me .  I’m glad you answered me the way you did about Freemasonry ! That organization is what is fantastic, but I get the feeling it is one of great suspicion also. The people have ideas about it , but most of them are more or less guesses. Since the 1950’s the Fraternity has gone downhill in that membership has gotten less and less each year.  I like to ask questions about the Masons just to check out what the impressions are. I wish membership would increase, but the Masons do not advertise. A new member is there because he learned about it and liked what he learned well enough to make that move himself. The Freemasons do not want anyone in there who has been coaxed to join.  I myself, wish they would advertise though.
We were talking about cults, and there really are many who still believe the Masons are just that.  Some out of ignorance; some are fairly knowledgable but have personal views that have them entertaining a lot of doubt, and some are just downright resentful. You mentioned The World Wide Church of God . The founder, Herbert Armstrong and his son Garner Ted, rejected the Freemasons and were antagonistic about them, if I remember right. Their attitude is not rare at all- a lot of churches and some religions , for some reason, are awfully annoyed and begrudging about them .As far as I’m concerned Worldwide is not a cult or a religion, but a personal version of Christianity. Neither is Freemasonry a cult or a religion.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 June 2008 07:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2927
Joined  2006-12-17
Dee - 19 June 2008 04:05 AM
burt - 18 June 2008 12:25 PM
Dee - 18 June 2008 05:23 AM
burt - 21 May 2007 04:57 PM

Here is a list I compiled about 25 years ago on symptoms that a group was a cult.

1. Are members expected to obey the leader without question at all times?

2. Do the group members show a lack of humor?  Are they unable to joke about their membership in the group?

3. If retreats or residential programs, or group living are involved does the food available have a low protein content and a poor nutritional value?

4. Does the group leadership benefit financially while ordinary group members suffer? 

5. Does the group promote an "end of the world" or "something great is about to happen" attitude?

6. Are group members and leadership unwilling to acknowledge the legitimacy of other groups?

7. Is there an "Us against Them" mentality? 

8. Does study within the group involve listening to long repetitive lectures, especially under conditions of physical duress (e.g., tired from physical work, seated for long periods without breaks, run-down from poor diet)? 

9. Is one of the main priorities for group members the recruitment of new members?

10. Do group members describe their reasons for being in the group, and the benefits that membership provides only in vague generalities?

11. Are proported experiences that cannot be described treated as if they had significant spiritual value?

12. Does the group encourage or discourage cult-like behavior in its members?

Every group may exhibit some of these symptoms in greater or lesser degree, and in every group there will be individuals whose psychological make-up is such that they engage in cultish behavior.  Legitimate groups will discourage this.


Burt, don’t take this as a criticism, but have you come by your conclusions about cults from actually been involved in one yourself ? You sound like you may be very bothered by the tendancy to confuse cults with religions , and there really should be some viable points one can check out to disern how to separate a cult from something else like it.
One thing though : not all “cults” bear the same earmarks you mentioned.  How about Scientology ( sp?)—is it a cult or a religion ?

What about Freemasonry ? This orginization seems to really stimulate a conflict of opinions. It would be interesting to know how you see it. It may be an example of how general society thinks about the subject.

How about the Latter Day Saints ? Thier doctrine is wayyy out, so to speak, and many people used to believe they were a cult. I’m still reluctant to call it a religion ; it is just a weird offshoot of the Chrstian bible . It’s a distortion

I haven’t been involved in what I would consider a cult, although back in the lat 70s I would occasionally go to introductory meetings and such of various groups and observe how they presented themselves.  I’ve also been involved in groups where cult-like behavior appeared, but was strongly discouraged.  The problem is that any group of people who get together for a purpose of self-development are going to experience cult symptoms—the issue is how these are handled, are they encouraged to grow, or simply acknowledged as part of the process and not given any power.  I put that list together for a group called something like Society Against Mind Abuse (if I recall) that was forming and, to my view, taking on some cult-like aspects itself while at the same time making blanket condemnations of some groups that I didn’t consider cults.

I don’t have enough information about Scientology, although it appears to be a cult.  The religion aspect was taken on to avoid paying taxes.  There are shades of grey, though, between cults and religions (think of cult as coming from cultivation, as a system that seeks to cultivate certain forms of human behavior and development).  A very good book that makes the distinction is The Sentimental Agents in the Volyan Empire, by Doris Lessing (a very sharp and funny, when not painful, satire).  In one scene she has one of the characters say to another (referring to a cult) “But their methods are almost the same as ours.”  The other character replies, “Yes, but with us, you chose.”  As for Freemasons, certain lodges may fall into cult-like behavior, but in general, as far as I can tell (I’m not a Mason) they have (and continue to have) a very positive influence on society.

So Scientology was presented as a religion to avoid paying taxes ? I don’t know, but I do know L. Ron Hubbard was as screwy as they come- he insisted he had visited Heaven ( and he found the “gates “( ya ! those ” Golden Gates) “well done, well built “. As a matter of fact he claimed to have have been there twice. The first time he came back describing heaven as having many marble statues and well-manicured landscapes (” like the Bush Gardens ” )and , sadly enough, all those arty things had “deteriorated ” when he saw it the last time. People believed that crap. It’s hard to believe a supposedly smart, talented and ultra-sucessful famous person like Tom Cruise would really accept it as the truth. That goes to show us how religion has the power to make fools of even the elite in society. Brains don’t seem to help a person who WANTS to believe. I hate to say this, but I can’t resist—: ..I can’t help but think of Barack Obama and how he seems to have cast a spell on so much of this country’s voters ( or even non-voters ! ), not because what he teaches is so extraordinary etc. , but because people WANT to see him as unusually fantastic. The whole idea of having someone like him in the oval office has got thier hearts beating and thier feelings fed ,and thier brains taking a nap. Sorry if you are a Obama supporter ! That’s just the way I see it. Seems like a good analogy to me.

Well, I got off-track- please excuse me .  I’m glad you answered me the way you did about Freemasonry ! That organization is what is fantastic, but I get the feeling it is one of great suspicion also. The people have ideas about it , but most of them are more or less guesses. Since the 1950’s the Fraternity has gone downhill in that membership has gotten less and less each year.  I like to ask questions about the Masons just to check out what the impressions are. I wish membership would increase, but the Masons do not advertise. A new member is there because he learned about it and liked what he learned well enough to make that move himself. The Freemasons do not want anyone in there who has been coaxed to join.  I myself, wish they would advertise though.
We were talking about cults, and there really are many who still believe the Masons are just that.  Some out of ignorance; some are fairly knowledgable but have personal views that have them entertaining a lot of doubt, and some are just downright resentful. You mentioned The World Wide Church of God . The founder, Herbert Armstrong and his son Garner Ted, rejected the Freemasons and were antagonistic about them, if I remember right. Their attitude is not rare at all- a lot of churches and some religions , for some reason, are awfully annoyed and begrudging about them .As far as I’m concerned Worldwide is not a cult or a religion, but a personal version of Christianity. Neither is Freemasonry a cult or a religion.

Good ol’ Elron (rhymes with Enron) was flim flam from the get go.  I recall a story that he and Robert A. Heinlein decided over a glass of beer back in the late 40s that the way to get really rich was to start a new religion.  An upshot of the conversation may have been Heinlein’s book Sixth Column, but Hubbard writing Dianetics and then starting Scientology is certainly part of the fall-out.

Couldn’t resist getting in the political plug, eh!  But you do have a point, not only about Obama, but any charismatic politician (Kennedy, Reagan, Trudeau in Canada, etc.).  Just because a politician attracts an enthusiastic following doesn’t mean they have evil intent, or are being manipulative; only that people will become attached to certain people and ideas.  That is the important point, people in groups have a natural tendency to fall into cult behavior.  I really do recommend the Doris Lessing book I mentioned above, as well as another of hers, Prisons We Chose to Live Inside.  This tendency of people to behave in certain group-oriented ways has been a particular interest of hers.  I didn’t mention the WWCofG, and have not hear the name Garner Ted Armstrong for years (Was it back in Texas?  Was there was some sort of scandle?).  The Catholic church is anti-mason, no good Catholic can be a Mason (from the Catholic side, not the Masonic).  Of course, no atheist can be a Mason….

[ Edited: 19 June 2008 07:24 AM by burt]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 November 2008 10:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1243
Joined  2005-11-14
zacherystaylor - 07 July 2008 01:31 AM

...
since neither religion or cults make an effort to figure out what is true I consider them all cults…

Hang on.  Mormons make a huge effort to figure out and help other new recruits figure out that Mormonism is true.

So do Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Likewise Islam.

and Scientology.

What is true <<to them>> is what they have concluded is true through study, prayer, fasting and applying the teachings of their particular group to real life scenarios… with measured success.

I probably misunderstood your point.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 November 2008 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2075
Joined  2007-07-20
Josh - 11 June 2008 02:00 PM

A cult is a religion without political power. (I heard that quote somewhere)

Josh,

The LDS is a cult, and it has a lot of political power.

Dennis

 Signature 

Truth, especially “moral truth,” is that elusive human creation whose exclusive apprehension is claimed by many, who then sanctimoniously condemn anyone else who does not agree with their particular apprehension, while denying that any question can be posed about their own apprehension.  I will try to avoid that tendency.  DEC

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 November 2008 02:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  96
Joined  2008-11-23
Josh - 11 June 2008 02:00 PM

A cult is a religion without political power. (I heard that quote somewhere)

But, if you get enough cult or religious members together and either suggest strongly or force them through leaders or idiology to vote a certain way, they DO have political power.

I read this somewhere:

“The last time religion dictated politics it was called the Dark Ages.”——Unknown

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 November 2008 02:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  96
Joined  2008-11-23
Noggin - 30 November 2008 03:56 AM
zacherystaylor - 07 July 2008 01:31 AM

...
since neither religion or cults make an effort to figure out what is true I consider them all cults…

Hang on.  Mormons make a huge effort to figure out and help other new recruits figure out that Mormonism is true.

So do Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Likewise Islam.

and Scientology.

What is true <<to them>> is what they have concluded is true through study, prayer, fasting and applying the teachings of their particular group to real life scenarios… with measured success.

I probably misunderstood your point.


Agreed, like Scientology and the Mormons, they do not start you out with the WHOLE story of their version of truth. Mormons phrase it as “Giving them milk until they are ready for the meat” When you are young or first join the church, the tales and doctrine is very simple and non-threatening…..gradually as you progress, you learn by brain washing to accept the really bizarre and weird beliefs.

Their “truth” is given very gradually because they know if all of the weird shit was hammered into them on day one….it would be harder to accept. The fasting and praying and buddy system just helps with the brain washing.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 November 2008 02:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2075
Joined  2007-07-20
CindyJayne - 30 November 2008 07:23 PM
Josh - 11 June 2008 02:00 PM

A cult is a religion without political power. (I heard that quote somewhere)

But, if you get enough cult or religious members together and either suggest strongly or force them through leaders or idiology to vote a certain way, they DO have political power.

I read this somewhere:

“The last time religion dictated politics it was called the Dark Ages.”——Unknown

Cindy,


That’s a disquieting thought.  But looking at large parts of the middle-east, we still have dark ages.

Dennis

 Signature 

Truth, especially “moral truth,” is that elusive human creation whose exclusive apprehension is claimed by many, who then sanctimoniously condemn anyone else who does not agree with their particular apprehension, while denying that any question can be posed about their own apprehension.  I will try to avoid that tendency.  DEC

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
 
RSS 2.0     Atom Feed