Did Sam miss anything in Waking Up?

 
medschoolstudent
 
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medschoolstudent
Total Posts:  84
Joined  19-10-2016
 
 
 
19 February 2017 14:02
 

Hello folks! So I finished reading Waking Up like a year ago and now I am wondering: Did Sam miss anything important in his book that can be considered “spiritual”? How can we make sense of things like charity and burial/cremation rites that are part of various religions-can those things be considered “spiritual” as well that Sam didn’t describe in Waking Up, or is it just that I am being over-concerned about things like charity and burial/cremation rites? Is there anything else that can be considered “spiritual” that Sam didn’t talk about or mention in that book?

 
 
brandon davis
 
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brandon davis
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Joined  01-03-2017
 
 
 
01 March 2017 20:11
 
medschoolstudent - 19 February 2017 02:02 PM

Hello folks! So I finished reading Waking Up like a year ago and now I am wondering: Did Sam miss anything important in his book that can be considered “spiritual”? How can we make sense of things like charity and burial/cremation rites that are part of various religions-can those things be considered “spiritual” as well that Sam didn’t describe in Waking Up, or is it just that I am being over-concerned about things like charity and burial/cremation rites? Is there anything else that can be considered “spiritual” that Sam didn’t talk about or mention in that book?

someone recently offered an argument attempting to
a) reconcile Representationalism with Pragmatism
b) offer a plausible Moral Realism
c) reconcile Natural Philosophy with Gnostikos (via Al-Chemy)
d) resolve Kripke’s P=/=NP
e) etc


but who knows, innit…
Cheers,
-b

 
Mkitto
 
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Mkitto
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Joined  18-04-2017
 
 
 
18 April 2017 09:17
 

I do agree that charity and burial traditions are spiritual.  In Buddhism charity or “Dana” is seen as a way to create good Kamma and as a foundation for meditation practice.  Also, cremation is symbolism of the impermanence of all phenomena.  I really enjoy Sam Harris’ work and podcast, but I do think he is missing some crucial elements of the Buddhist tradition (as well as other religious traditions) by cherry picking the parts of meditation he views as useful and leaving out some of the other important parts of the tradition such as the ones you mentioned.