MEDITATING: Some Problems and Solutions.

 
Eucan
 
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Eucan
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Joined  20-11-2016
 
 
 
16 March 2017 20:50
 

This posting was initially intended as an answer to a specific post but I am unable to locate the thead to the past posting where someone new to meditating complained about having tingling sensation in her face during her meditation sittings. As I have some experience in the endavour (decades) & I am trying to be helpful, I wrote my general suggestions of how to tackle the problem. But I also hope that my posting can straighten some misunderstandings about the practice and will help a few to avoid some obstacles to meditation.

One ingredient of the method of meditation is to ‘separate’ your mind, as much as possible, from the 5-sense sensations. We want to relieve our mind from the heavy bombardment by our sensory impulses during our normal state of being awake in order to take a look at the mind itself. (Who is really taking a look at whom is a valid issue but I am not addressing it here). How does mind behave when the senses are switched off? It is a Buddist take on epistemology of our mind, on knowing itself. Of course, one of the natural form of the relief is to fall asleep – all 5 senses become irrelevant and our mind wonders freely – but dreaming is void of the focus normally present when we are awake. We need the focus during meditating.

At the beginning stage the object is to develop an automatic reaction where one is NOT taken in by the content of the normally appearing thoughts. Instad one becomes as a watcher of the thoughts, ignoring the thoughts’ content. The idea is to eventually add another more insightful dimension to one’s everyday mental life - a perspective which is more general or which is beyond our own thoughts and which does not interrupts the thought process itself with all its inherent logic (or lack of it) or its emotions. As a simplification one might think of the perspective as an omnipresent quiet thought about having thoughts. The thoughts come an go, but the perspective has some aspect of staying put, alghough you may (rightly) argue that it is just another kind of thought, but on some another, more general level.

A practictioner will eventually be able to revoke at any time the state previously practiced during the sitting meditations. Ideally, one should be able to revoke the previously-attained state even when in pain. Theoretically, even the tingling sensation of (your) face should subjectively subside as a byproduct of your meditating.

HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS HOW TO START MEDITATING:

After taking a few deep breaths of fresh air, sit down with your back straight. Balance your head on your shoulders. Put your hands somewhere on your tights.

[During the whole meditation do not force your concentration, do not overly relax – stay somewhere in the middle].

During the first 10 breaths attempt to concentrate uninterruptedly on the air coming out and going in to your nose. When a thought interrupts, patiently come back to concentrating on the air. At this stage you are practicing developing an “automatic stabilizer”, i.e., a reaction to automatically or mechanically returning to concentrating on the air movement in response to occurrence of an interrupting thought. Note that there is nothing profound or complicated here. Just a simple repetitive task of mastering a specific reaction to the appearing thoughts - leaving them alone.

[NOTE: There is no special ‘wisdom’ in concentrating on breathing, just practicality: you are trying to hook up your concentration to a repetitive and uninterruptedly occurring phisiological process, breathing, hoping that your concentration will become as uninterrupted as is your breathing.]

It is useful to think about the unterrupting thoughts as being ‘important’ because they offer you the opportunity to practice your mind mastering. Their unwelcomed appearing shows what it is that you must get beyond of. So greet each thought occurrence with your open heart.

Later, you may repeat several times the series of say 10 breaths, but do not overdo. You will need to perfect the automatic stabilizer to concentrate on deeper mind penetration later on. You can not tackle that stage without first having the skill of automatic stabilizer operating truly automatically. Once you learn it, it will stay with you like the ability to swim. The automatic stabilizer will become your default reaction and an anchor of sanity when you decide to remove the carpet of safety from under the feet of your existence as a separate person. [For now you may treat this last sentence as poetry of a mad man].

After the breathing exercises, you may do the following traditional Buddhist exercise:

Imagine white substance, like white light, gradually filing up your body from the top down. All the muscles (including each of the muscles o your face) along the descending frontier of the light boundary become relaxed. Think of the light representing accomplishment of the goals of you meditation which is to see the mind up close as it really is. You might ‘believe’ this to be a beneficial practice, or you may simply understand that you are practiicing developing concentration needed to get to better know your own mind etc., any of the two perspectives would work. The light, by filling you up, pushes the darker (‘un-enlightened’) parts of you body out completely. There is no magic in all this, just hard work that beutifully pays off.

I hope that these suggestions will help you to get rid of the tingling.

[ Edited: 16 March 2017 21:34 by Eucan]
 
Eucan
 
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Eucan
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Joined  20-11-2016
 
 
 
16 March 2017 21:31
 
Eucan - 16 March 2017 08:50 PM

This posting was initially intended as an answer to a specific post but I am unable to locate the thead to the past posting where someone new to meditating complained about having tingling sensation in her face during her meditation sittings. As I have some experience in the endavour (decades) & I am trying to be helpful, I wrote my general suggestions of how to tackle the problem. But I also hope that my posting can straighten some misunderstandings about the practice and will help a few to avoid some obstacles to meditation.

One ingredient of the method of meditation is to ‘separate’ your mind, as much as possible, from the 5-sense sensations. We want to relieve our mind from the heavy bombardment by our sensory impulses during our normal state of being awake in order to take a look at the mind itself. (Who is really taking a look at whom is a valid issue but I am not addressing it here). How does mind behave when the senses are switched off? It is a Buddist take on epistemology of our mind, on knowing itself. Of course, one of the natural form of the relief is to fall asleep – all 5 senses become irrelevant and our mind wonders freely – but dreaming is void of the focus normally present when we are awake. We need the focus during meditating.

At beginning stage the object is to develop an automatic reaction where one is NOT taken in by the content of the normally appearing thoughts. Instad one stays as a watcher of the thoughts, ignoring the thoughts’ content. The idea is to eventually add another more insightful dimension to one’s everyday mental life - a perspective which is more general or which is beyond our own thoughts and which does not interrupts the thought process itself with all its inherent logic (or lack of it) or its emotions. As a simplification one might think of the perspective as an omnipresent quiet thought about having thoughts. The thoughts come an go, but the perspective has some aspect of staying put, alghough you may (rightly) argue that it is just another kind of thought, but on some another, more general level.

A practictioner will eventually be able to revoke at any time the state previously practiced during the sitting meditations. Ideally, one should be able to revoke the previously-attained state even when in pain. Theoretically, even the tingling sensation of (your) face should subjectively subside as a byproduct of your meditating.

HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS HOW TO START MEDITATING:

After taking a few deep breaths of fresh air, sit down with your back straight. Balance your head on your shoulders. Put your hands somewhere on your tights.

[During the whole meditation do not force your concentration, do not overly relax – stay somewhere in the middle].

During the first 10 breaths attempt to concentrate uninterruptedly on the air coming out and going in to your nose. When a thought interrupts, patiently come back to concentrating on the air. At this stage you are practicing developing an “automatic stabilizer”, i.e., a reaction to automatically or mechanically returning to concentrating on the air movement in response to occurrence of an interrupting thought. Note that there is nothing profound or complicated here. Just a simple repetitive task of mastering a specific reaction to the appearing thoughts - leaving them alone.

[NOTE: There is no special ‘wisdom’ in concentrating on breathing, just practicality: you are trying to hook up your concentration to a repetitive and uninterruptedly occurring phisiological process, breathing, hoping that your concentration will become as uninterrupted as is your breathing.]

It is useful to think about the unterrupting thoughts as being ‘important’ because they offer you the opportunity to practice your mind mastering. Their unwelcomed appearing shows what it is that you must get beyond of. So greet each thought occurrence with your open heart.

Later, you may repeat several times the series of say 10 breaths, but do not overdo. You will need to perfect the automatic stabilizer to concentrate on deeper mind penetration later on. You can not tackle that stage without first having the skill of automatic stabilizer operating truly automatically. Once you learn it, it will stay with you like the ability to swim. The automatic stabilizer will become your default reaction and an anchor of sanity when you decide to remove the carpet of safety from under the feet of your existence as a separate person. [For now you may treat this last sentence as poetry of a mad man].

After the breathing exercises, you may do the following traditional Buddhist exercise:

Imagine white substance, like white light, gradually filing up your body from the top down. All the muscles (including each of the muscles o your face) along the descending frontier of the light boundary become relaxed. Think of the light representing accomplishment of the goals of you meditation which is to see the mind up close as it really is. You might ‘believe’ this to be a beneficial practice, or you may simply understand that you are practiicing developing concentration needed to get to better know your own mind etc., any of the two perspectives would work. The light, by filling you up, pushes the darker (‘un-enlightened’) parts of you body out completely. There is no magic in all this, just hard work that beutifully pays off.

I hope that these suggestions will help you to get rid of the tingling.

 
Eucan
 
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Eucan
Total Posts:  4
Joined  20-11-2016
 
 
 
16 March 2017 21:33
 
Eucan - 16 March 2017 08:50 PM

This posting was initially intended as an answer to a specific post but I am unable to locate the thead to the past posting where someone new to meditating complained about having tingling sensation in her face during her meditation sittings. As I have some experience in the endavour (decades) & I am trying to be helpful, I wrote my general suggestions of how to tackle the problem. But I also hope that my posting can straighten some misunderstandings about the practice and will help a few to avoid some obstacles to meditation.

One ingredient of the method of meditation is to ‘separate’ your mind, as much as possible, from the 5-sense sensations. We want to relieve our mind from the heavy bombardment by our sensory impulses during our normal state of being awake in order to take a look at the mind itself. (Who is really taking a look at whom is a valid issue but I am not addressing it here). How does mind behave when the senses are switched off? It is a Buddist take on epistemology of our mind, on knowing itself. Of course, one of the natural form of the relief is to fall asleep – all 5 senses become irrelevant and our mind wonders freely – but dreaming is void of the focus normally present when we are awake. We need the focus during meditating.

At the beginning stage the object is to develop an automatic reaction where one is NOT taken in by the content of the normally appearing thoughts. Instad one stays as a watcher of the thoughts, ignoring the thoughts’ content. The idea is to eventually add another more insightful dimension to one’s everyday mental life - a perspective which is more general or which is beyond our own thoughts and which does not interrupts the thought process itself with all its inherent logic (or lack of it) or its emotions. As a simplification one might think of the perspective as an omnipresent quiet thought about having thoughts. The thoughts come an go, but the perspective has some aspect of staying put, alghough you may (rightly) argue that it is just another kind of thought, but on some another, more general level.

A practictioner will eventually be able to revoke at any time the state previously practiced during the sitting meditations. Ideally, one should be able to revoke the previously-attained state even when in pain. Theoretically, even the tingling sensation of (your) face should subjectively subside as a byproduct of your meditating.

HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS HOW TO START MEDITATING:

After taking a few deep breaths of fresh air, sit down with your back straight. Balance your head on your shoulders. Put your hands somewhere on your tights.

[During the whole meditation do not force your concentration, do not overly relax – stay somewhere in the middle].

During the first 10 breaths attempt to concentrate uninterruptedly on the air coming out and going in to your nose. When a thought interrupts, patiently come back to concentrating on the air. At this stage you are practicing developing an “automatic stabilizer”, i.e., a reaction to automatically or mechanically returning to concentrating on the air movement in response to occurrence of an interrupting thought. Note that there is nothing profound or complicated here. Just a simple repetitive task of mastering a specific reaction to the appearing thoughts - leaving them alone.

[NOTE: There is no special ‘wisdom’ in concentrating on breathing, just practicality: you are trying to hook up your concentration to a repetitive and uninterruptedly occurring phisiological process, breathing, hoping that your concentration will become as uninterrupted as is your breathing.]

It is useful to think about the unterrupting thoughts as being ‘important’ because they offer you the opportunity to practice your mind mastering. Their unwelcomed appearing shows what it is that you must get beyond of. So greet each thought occurrence with your open heart.

Later, you may repeat several times the series of say 10 breaths, but do not overdo. You will need to perfect the automatic stabilizer to concentrate on deeper mind penetration later on. You can not tackle that stage without first having the skill of automatic stabilizer operating truly automatically. Once you learn it, it will stay with you like the ability to swim. The automatic stabilizer will become your default reaction and an anchor of sanity when you decide to remove the carpet of safety from under the feet of your existence as a separate person. [For now you may treat this last sentence as poetry of a mad man].

After the breathing exercises, you may do the following traditional Buddhist exercise:

Imagine white substance, like white light, gradually filing up your body from the top down. All the muscles (including each of the muscles o your face) along the descending frontier of the light boundary become relaxed. Think of the light representing accomplishment of the goals of you meditation which is to see the mind up close as it really is. You might ‘believe’ this to be a beneficial practice, or you may simply understand that you are practiicing developing concentration needed to get to better know your own mind etc., any of the two perspectives would work. The light, by filling you up, pushes the darker (‘un-enlightened’) parts of you body out completely. There is no magic in all this, just hard work that beutifully pays off.

I hope that these suggestions will help you to get rid of the tingling.

 
Eucan
 
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Eucan
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Joined  20-11-2016
 
 
 
16 March 2017 21:34
 
Eucan - 16 March 2017 09:33 PM
Eucan - 16 March 2017 08:50 PM

This posting was initially intended as an answer to a specific post but I am unable to locate the thead to the past posting where someone new to meditating complained about having tingling sensation in her face during her meditation sittings. As I have some experience in the endavour (decades) & I am trying to be helpful, I wrote my general suggestions of how to tackle the problem. But I also hope that my posting can straighten some misunderstandings about the practice and will help a few to avoid some obstacles to meditation.

One ingredient of the method of meditation is to ‘separate’ your mind, as much as possible, from the 5-sense sensations. We want to relieve our mind from the heavy bombardment by our sensory impulses during our normal state of being awake in order to take a look at the mind itself. (Who is really taking a look at whom is a valid issue but I am not addressing it here). How does mind behave when the senses are switched off? It is a Buddist take on epistemology of our mind, on knowing itself. Of course, one of the natural form of the relief is to fall asleep – all 5 senses become irrelevant and our mind wonders freely – but dreaming is void of the focus normally present when we are awake. We need the focus during meditating.

At the beginning stage the object is to develop an automatic reaction where one is NOT taken in by the content of the normally appearing thoughts. Instad one stays as a watcher of the thoughts, ignoring the thoughts’ content. The idea is to eventually add another more insightful dimension to one’s everyday mental life - a perspective which is more general or which is beyond our own thoughts and which does not interrupts the thought process itself with all its inherent logic (or lack of it) or its emotions. As a simplification one might think of the perspective as an omnipresent quiet thought about having thoughts. The thoughts come an go, but the perspective has some aspect of staying put, alghough you may (rightly) argue that it is just another kind of thought, but on some another, more general level.

A practictioner will eventually be able to revoke at any time the state previously practiced during the sitting meditations. Ideally, one should be able to revoke the previously-attained state even when in pain. Theoretically, even the tingling sensation of (your) face should subjectively subside as a byproduct of your meditating.

HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS HOW TO START MEDITATING:

After taking a few deep breaths of fresh air, sit down with your back straight. Balance your head on your shoulders. Put your hands somewhere on your tights.

[During the whole meditation do not force your concentration, do not overly relax – stay somewhere in the middle].

During the first 10 breaths attempt to concentrate uninterruptedly on the air coming out and going in to your nose. When a thought interrupts, patiently come back to concentrating on the air. At this stage you are practicing developing an “automatic stabilizer”, i.e., a reaction to automatically or mechanically returning to concentrating on the air movement in response to occurrence of an interrupting thought. Note that there is nothing profound or complicated here. Just a simple repetitive task of mastering a specific reaction to the appearing thoughts - leaving them alone.

[NOTE: There is no special ‘wisdom’ in concentrating on breathing, just practicality: you are trying to hook up your concentration to a repetitive and uninterruptedly occurring phisiological process, breathing, hoping that your concentration will become as uninterrupted as is your breathing.]

It is useful to think about the unterrupting thoughts as being ‘important’ because they offer you the opportunity to practice your mind mastering. Their unwelcomed appearing shows what it is that you must get beyond of. So greet each thought occurrence with your open heart.

Later, you may repeat several times the series of say 10 breaths, but do not overdo. You will need to perfect the automatic stabilizer to concentrate on deeper mind penetration later on. You can not tackle that stage without first having the skill of automatic stabilizer operating truly automatically. Once you learn it, it will stay with you like the ability to swim. The automatic stabilizer will become your default reaction and an anchor of sanity when you decide to remove the carpet of safety from under the feet of your existence as a separate person. [For now you may treat this last sentence as poetry of a mad man].

After the breathing exercises, you may do the following traditional Buddhist exercise:

Imagine white substance, like white light, gradually filing up your body from the top down. All the muscles (including each of the muscles o your face) along the descending frontier of the light boundary become relaxed. Think of the light representing accomplishment of the goals of you meditation which is to see the mind up close as it really is. You might ‘believe’ this to be a beneficial practice, or you may simply understand that you are practiicing developing concentration needed to get to better know your own mind etc., any of the two perspectives would work. The light, by filling you up, pushes the darker (‘un-enlightened’) parts of you body out completely. There is no magic in all this, just hard work that beutifully pays off.

I hope that these suggestions will help you to get rid of the tingling.

 
Nhoj Morley
 
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Nhoj Morley
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16 March 2017 22:41
 

Are you having some trouble here?

 
MARTIN_UK
 
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MARTIN_UK
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17 March 2017 01:11
 

The thread in question is here…

Probably a better place than Forum Requests?