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Awareness and Perception

 
Ground
 
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Ground
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17 July 2017 00:59
 
Jb8989 - 10 July 2017 01:26 PM

Colloquially and professionally, I watch as scientists and academics use these words interchangeably all the time. I’m wondering to what extent you think these concepts have a psychological distinction? This conversation commonly collapsed into the argument about whether the self and free will exists, but maybe we can keep them separate.

Awareness is a knower, something that knows while perception is the condition/prerequisite for knowing. This however is a rational analytical difference which does not necessarily make a difference psychologically.

 
Giulio
 
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17 July 2017 05:17
 

Take a look at this mask illusion. You become aware something is wrong with your perception when the back of the mask disappears into the front. Even though I have seen this several times and am aware of what I am actually seeing, my perception stays with the same incorrect fiction. This suggests that there is something creative/active about perception (presumably model based). Perhaps awareness has something fundamentally to do with identifying the errors between the predictions of perception and the subsequent incoming sensory data, the purpose of which is to guide us in taking subsequent actions (and hopefully improve the models our perceptions are using - even though in this example the model my perception is using does not change).

 
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17 July 2017 07:59
 
Giulio - 17 July 2017 05:17 AM

... This suggests that there is something creative/active about perception (presumably model based).

Perception always is synthesis, conditioned synthesis. This however does not negate that it is the condition/prerequisite for knowing. There is the possiblity that a tricked perception may be corrected by some further perception to entail valid knowledge. But even valid knowledge is based on perception that is synthesis. Perception is not what naive realists consider it to be. The synthesis is twofold: 1. conditioned by the apparatus including conditioned brain and 2. conditioned by mental consciousness when intuition starts to set in and is developed further to full-fledged conceptuality. The 2nd portion builds what one is aware of, i.e. the ‘something’ that one knows intuitively and conceptually.

[ Edited: 17 July 2017 08:05 by Ground]
 
LadyJane
 
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17 July 2017 08:15
 

That Charlie Chaplin mask was remarkable.  Ever cool.  One day recently I encountered a deer in the forest and sensed it before I was able to locate it visually.  Whatever informed me it was there wasn’t entirely precise but mostly a suspicion based on probability.  So I remained still and began ruling things out.  Through a combination of perception, proximity and experience, I’m guessing.  The moment it came into view is what stands out in my memory.  It was so perfectly camouflaged.  As I was becoming aware of its presence it appeared in a series of stages.  I remember first noticing the outline, then as it slowly moved forward, it was as though it sort of filled in its own frame before fully materializing.  And once I was confident enough to recognize and identify what I was observing, through the thick brush, I realized that it fulfilled an expectation of the model already fixed in my mind.  Which actually felt very Matrix-like at the time.  Anticipating another animal, I’m less familiar with, probably would never have occurred to me.  Anyway, the whole thing took only a few seconds and I’m pretty sure it saw me before I saw it.  The sneaky bastard.

 
 
EN
 
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17 July 2017 10:56
 
burt - 16 July 2017 09:04 AM
EN - 15 July 2017 08:57 PM

Words like these can mean what you want them to mean, but generally awareness precedes perception.  I become aware of someone’s presence. Then as I focus on them, I perceive things about them.  Perception is a higher level of consciousness, in my view.

How did your awareness and perception enjoy the cruise?

I became aware of the drinking possibilities at the ship bar and in all the ports of call.  Then I perceived how wonderful all that liquid ecstasy truly is. 

Seriously, it was all great. A few glitches,  but nothing in comparison to the delights.

 
burt
 
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17 July 2017 12:26
 
LadyJane - 17 July 2017 08:15 AM

That Charlie Chaplin mask was remarkable.  Ever cool.  One day recently I encountered a deer in the forest and sensed it before I was able to locate it visually.  Whatever informed me it was there wasn’t entirely precise but mostly a suspicion based on probability.  So I remained still and began ruling things out.  Through a combination of perception, proximity and experience, I’m guessing.  The moment it came into view is what stands out in my memory.  It was so perfectly camouflaged.  As I was becoming aware of its presence it appeared in a series of stages.  I remember first noticing the outline, then as it slowly moved forward, it was as though it sort of filled in its own frame before fully materializing.  And once I was confident enough to recognize and identify what I was observing, through the thick brush, I realized that it fulfilled an expectation of the model already fixed in my mind.  Which actually felt very Matrix-like at the time.  Anticipating another animal, I’m less familiar with, probably would never have occurred to me.  Anyway, the whole thing took only a few seconds and I’m pretty sure it saw me before I saw it.  The sneaky bastard.

Can I use this story in a paper I’m writing? Gives a good example of how we reason to fill out subtle intuitions.

 
LadyJane
 
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17 July 2017 18:48
 
burt - 17 July 2017 12:26 PM
LadyJane - 17 July 2017 08:15 AM

That Charlie Chaplin mask was remarkable.  Ever cool.  One day recently I encountered a deer in the forest and sensed it before I was able to locate it visually.  Whatever informed me it was there wasn’t entirely precise but mostly a suspicion based on probability.  So I remained still and began ruling things out.  Through a combination of perception, proximity and experience, I’m guessing.  The moment it came into view is what stands out in my memory.  It was so perfectly camouflaged.  As I was becoming aware of its presence it appeared in a series of stages.  I remember first noticing the outline, then as it slowly moved forward, it was as though it sort of filled in its own frame before fully materializing.  And once I was confident enough to recognize and identify what I was observing, through the thick brush, I realized that it fulfilled an expectation of the model already fixed in my mind.  Which actually felt very Matrix-like at the time.  Anticipating another animal, I’m less familiar with, probably would never have occurred to me.  Anyway, the whole thing took only a few seconds and I’m pretty sure it saw me before I saw it.  The sneaky bastard.

Can I use this story in a paper I’m writing? Gives a good example of how we reason to fill out subtle intuitions.

Sure thing, sir.  And to think I almost didn’t even share that little story.  Adjusting the pace really makes us available to take in all the beauty to be found out there.  The very idea you find it somewhat useful makes my day.

 
 
burt
 
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18 July 2017 07:36
 
LadyJane - 17 July 2017 06:48 PM
burt - 17 July 2017 12:26 PM
LadyJane - 17 July 2017 08:15 AM

That Charlie Chaplin mask was remarkable.  Ever cool.  One day recently I encountered a deer in the forest and sensed it before I was able to locate it visually.  Whatever informed me it was there wasn’t entirely precise but mostly a suspicion based on probability.  So I remained still and began ruling things out.  Through a combination of perception, proximity and experience, I’m guessing.  The moment it came into view is what stands out in my memory.  It was so perfectly camouflaged.  As I was becoming aware of its presence it appeared in a series of stages.  I remember first noticing the outline, then as it slowly moved forward, it was as though it sort of filled in its own frame before fully materializing.  And once I was confident enough to recognize and identify what I was observing, through the thick brush, I realized that it fulfilled an expectation of the model already fixed in my mind.  Which actually felt very Matrix-like at the time.  Anticipating another animal, I’m less familiar with, probably would never have occurred to me.  Anyway, the whole thing took only a few seconds and I’m pretty sure it saw me before I saw it.  The sneaky bastard.

Can I use this story in a paper I’m writing? Gives a good example of how we reason to fill out subtle intuitions.

Sure thing, sir.  And to think I almost didn’t even share that little story.  Adjusting the pace really makes us available to take in all the beauty to be found out there.  The very idea you find it somewhat useful makes my day.

Thanks, it’s a very neat story and well written, too.

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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19 July 2017 10:37
 

I’m beginning to think that awareness seems to work best with two psychological definitions. (1) as passive neurological activity that sets the cognitive foundation for a conscious observer to organize, interpret and prioritize thoughts, and (2) as a plastic capacity that allows for one’s perception to observe varying magnitudes of situational stimulus and memory.

Example number 1: I’m awake so therefore to some extent I am consciously aware of my surroundings. Example number 2: The extent of my ability to perceive what’s going on around me depends on my awareness capacity.

A perception is an aggregate of thoughts, emotions, memories, senses etc, that are stimulus sensitive and detrimentally reliant upon the plastic capacity definition of awareness that I used above. I might say that Awareness #1 + Perception = Experience. And that: Awareness #1 + Perception + Awareness #2 = Both knowledge AND cognitive dissonance depending on people’s varying ability to apply (and re-apply) some other forms of executive level thought such as critical thinking, emotional intelligence, reasoning capacity, attention, etc.

[ Edited: 19 July 2017 12:28 by Jb8989]
 
 
EN
 
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19 July 2017 11:51
 
Jb8989 - 19 July 2017 10:37 AM

I’m beginning to think that awareness seems to work best with two psychological definitions. (1) as passive neurological activity that sets the cognitive foundation for a conscious observer to organize, interpret and prioritize thoughts, and (2) as a plastic capacity that allows for one’s perception to observe varying magnitudes of situational stimulus and memory.

Example number 1: I’m awake so therefore to some extent I am consciously aware of my surroundings. Example number 2: The extent of my ability to perceive what’s going on around me depends on my awareness capacity.

A perception is an aggravate of thoughts, emotions, memories, senses etc, that are stimulus sensitive and detrimentally reliant upon the plastic capacity definition of awareness that I used above. I might say that Awareness #1 + Perception = Experience. And that: Awareness #1 + Perception + Awareness #2 = Both knowledge AND cognitive dissonance depending on people’s varying ability to apply (and re-apply) some other forms of executive level thought such as critical thinking, emotional intelligence, reasoning capacity, attention, etc.

This fits generally with my experience/understanding of the terms.  Perception is a higher order of consciousness, but requires awareness as a condition precedent.

 
LadyJane
 
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20 July 2017 04:15
 

Perceptions are running constantly from the moment we arrive into the world until the moment we leave.  Sensations develop and strengthen, or weaken, given time.  If it’s the mechanism that enables us to sort our surroundings, and facilitates awareness by alerting our attention, then perception precedes awareness.  And not the other way round.

 
 
Jb8989
 
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20 July 2017 12:33
 
EN - 19 July 2017 11:51 AM
Jb8989 - 19 July 2017 10:37 AM

I’m beginning to think that awareness seems to work best with two psychological definitions. (1) as passive neurological activity that sets the cognitive foundation for a conscious observer to organize, interpret and prioritize thoughts, and (2) as a plastic capacity that allows for one’s perception to observe varying magnitudes of situational stimulus and memory.

Example number 1: I’m awake so therefore to some extent I am consciously aware of my surroundings. Example number 2: The extent of my ability to perceive what’s going on around me depends on my awareness capacity.

A perception is an aggravate of thoughts, emotions, memories, senses etc, that are stimulus sensitive and detrimentally reliant upon the plastic capacity definition of awareness that I used above. I might say that Awareness #1 + Perception = Experience. And that: Awareness #1 + Perception + Awareness #2 = Both knowledge AND cognitive dissonance depending on people’s varying ability to apply (and re-apply) some other forms of executive level thought such as critical thinking, emotional intelligence, reasoning capacity, attention, etc.

This fits generally with my experience/understanding of the terms.  Perception is a higher order of consciousness, but requires awareness as a condition precedent.

That sounds about right. Here’s where we’re at today:

For the most part we use brain activity that develops into a person “possessing” self-awareness as the primary indicator of healthy conscious human life (early on). “Self aware” in this context means the ability to perceptually recognize and react to your own personhood and distinguish between the mind/body/environment dichotomy with vague concepts like intention and controlled processing.

The thing about self awareness is that before the “self” part arises, the awareness part is used to describe turning the lights on. For example, a later term fetus is aware of its sensory mechanisms to a certain degree, however automated its responses and unconscious its perception(s). That’s definition number 1 for awareness. It nearly collapses into the next phenomena, and that is that unconscious processing that influence experience, thought and action are themselves a type of perception. Hence the problem with the interchangeable nature of these terms.

The more recognizable, more colloquial definition of perception is basically perspective. And while these unconscious perceptions factor into our perspective, they do so outside of our perception’s awareness ability. Awareness definition number 2.

So we’re now at two definition for awareness and one for perception generally and one for the act of “perceiving” specifically.

[ Edited: 20 July 2017 12:40 by Jb8989]
 
 
LadyJane
 
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20 July 2017 12:54
 

Something compelled me to Google the meaning of the word subliminal

Subliminal: (of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone’s mind without their being aware of it.

What do we make of this in the grand scheme of human perception?

 
 
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20 July 2017 13:53
 
LadyJane - 20 July 2017 12:54 PM

Something compelled me to Google the meaning of the word subliminal

Subliminal: (of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone’s mind without their being aware of it.

What do we make of this in the grand scheme of human perception?

That perception meets varying points where its awareness #2 ability ends (or is disinterested, unstimulated or asleep), but unconscious processing still continues to some vaguely quantifiable degree.

 
 
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20 July 2017 14:37
 
Jb8989 - 20 July 2017 01:53 PM
LadyJane - 20 July 2017 12:54 PM

Something compelled me to Google the meaning of the word subliminal

Subliminal: (of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone’s mind without their being aware of it.

What do we make of this in the grand scheme of human perception?

That perception meets varying points where its awareness #2 ability ends (or is disinterested, unstimulated or asleep), but unconscious processing still continues to some vaguely quantifiable degree.

The wheels of the brain are turning all the time or most of the time.  It’s doing stuff - we just don’t become aware of it at first, sometimes not at all, and later we may perceive things if we focus.  Some people go through life like they are on automatic pilot all the time.

 
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