Your last possession

 
 
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Anthro
Total Posts:  81
Joined  08-11-2005
 
 
 
02 March 2006 12:00
 

This topic is not religious or secular. What I want people to reply to is the following question:

You are on your death bed, or in the nursing home (basically in the final year(s) of your life); what would be the one, last possession you want to have/own/hold/look at?  This is not a person but an object.

Keep you answers to one single word, please.

 
 
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Iisbliss
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02 March 2006 12:19
 

A long, long,  time ago I was in a very bad scary place, and I sorta left my body, and imagined myself in a very small hard glowing rock like thing located somewhere in my chest above my heart and below my throat, that held “me”.

When I meditate now, this little thing, whatever it is, often becomes the focus and center of my attention.  I realize it is just an image constructed by my brain, that represents to me some kind of inner being, some kind of safe place.

Most likely when I die, this will be the last “possession” I will be “looking” at.

 
psiconoclast
 
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psiconoclast
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02 March 2006 13:40
 

I kind of hope that I go out all of a sudden, and don’t spend any appreciable amount of time on a death bed.

That said, if it is my ultimate fate to die slowly enough that I have multiple days in which I have little to do save to say my farewells, and reflect on my life, I hope to face it with as much grace as possible.  Beyond the basic creature comforts (a clean warm bed, food, water, etc.) that would make my final days physically as pleasant as possible, I can’t think of a single thing that I would want.  Unless I happened to be reading a good book, in which case I would probably try to finish that when I wasn’t sleeping or talking with friends and family.

-Matt

 
 
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nv
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02 March 2006 14:15
 

A full IV bottle above my head containing something that would allow me to feel good.

 
 
 
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Peregrine
Total Posts:  88
Joined  11-03-2005
 
 
 
02 March 2006 14:33
 

Many people believe when you die, your entire life flashes before your eyes.  That is what I would want.  Just place a very large screen at the foot of my bed and run a slideshow of my life, my loves, family, friends, essentially the “times of my life”. 

Add a few thousand exquisite photos of a natural earth, its animal inhabitants, many mountainscapes, seascapes, and those fantastic photos of the cosmos.

I could die with a happy, content smile on my face and wonderful memories of a life that was lived.

Maggie

 
 
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Anthro
Total Posts:  81
Joined  08-11-2005
 
 
 
03 March 2006 13:22
 

I am fasinated. While I asked only for simple one word responses, it is really interesting how (sample size of 3) there is need to set the context for the answer. I am not bashing the replies. I guess this raises a second question - does simplicity (like a single possession) need contexual organization for understanding?  It is clear that the context is quite personal and has meaning only to that individual.

Anyone else wish to venture their last possession?

Anthro

 
 
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Peregrine
Total Posts:  88
Joined  11-03-2005
 
 
 
03 March 2006 14:52
 

[quote author=“Anthro”] I guess this raises a second question - does simplicity (like a single possession) need contexual organization for understanding?  It is clear that the context is quite personal and has meaning only to that individual.
Anthro

No, Anthro, I believe the simplicity you speak of seldom has a need for contexual organization for understanding.  The simplicity of a single possession would normally speak for itself.  If you had asked the same question in reference to other moments in a person’s life, you would probably have received numerous single answers relating to pleasure factors, perhaps deeply meaningful, perhaps simply joyful.

I find it much more interesting that the individuals responding did not perceive a relationship with “possessions” at this time in their life.  In anticipation of death, it would seem possessions have no value.  I think that is what everyone was trying to express.  I considered writing that (the simplicity of nothing), but like the others, chose instead to use the opportunity to express a broader perception.  Dying is an inward journey.  Even the most treasured possession would seem rather superfluous and distracting. 

Yes, we all ignored your request, but the opportunity to express what flowed through my thoughts was just too tempting to resist.

Maggie