Aleister Crowley (aka The Beast)

 
 
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William
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07 June 2006 06:10
 

"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law". Crowley

I can't believe that I'm just getting wind of this guy, Aleister Crowley. Is the notion that he gives us above similar to Rand's Objectivism?
Anyway, does anyone know what Crowley's most popular book was? Thanks,
William

PS-
I was looking at this John Cowper Powys article when I came across Crowley:
 

 
 
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Mulaka
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07 June 2006 06:20
 

I think it was Magick: Book 4 parts I-IV.

 
 
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William
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07 June 2006 07:19
 

OK.
I read some of the Amazon reviews. It doesn’t look like you just break off a piece of this guy and run-off, but rather sit down for the whole meal or don’t bother coming. Even looks like shades of Krishnamurti, Shakespeare, etc., but then all extravagant writers are in large part ‘compilers’ as well.
Interesting to see Rabelais (Gar & Pan) cited in connection to him (  ). I have that book on my shelf already, and believe I will try it next.
William

 
 
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Celsus
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07 June 2006 12:19
 

Aleister Crowley was a drunken, drug addicted, syhpilis ridden, mysoginistic, masochistics, scumbag with delusions of grandure. He thought himself to be evil, but evil to him seemed little more than ingesting huge quantities of drugs and screwing any thing that moved. An amusing figure to read about, to be sure, but don’t go to him for any insights.

Heres what the Amazing Randi ( http://www.randi.org/ ) says about him:

Crowley, Aleister (1875-1947) Described in his time as “the most evil man alive” and “the wickedest man in the world,” Crowley was a British magician who was violently opposed to Christianity. He founded his own religion based on himself as a holy figure and loved every nasty thing the public said about him.
    He liked to be known as “The Beast 666,” from the biblical reference in Revelation to that magical number, and also liked to believe that he was a reincarnation of Edward Kelley, the rascally associate of Dr. John Dee.
    In common with other gurus, Crowley liked to create his own nomenclature, referring to magic as “magick” and defining it as

the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will.   

The definition, though wishful, does not differ substantially from others.
    Crowley reportedly had a powerful effect on women and separated many widows, spinsters and bored dilettantes from their cash in order to support his chosen lifestyle. He fascinated his followers with lavish costumes, animal sacrifices, other weird rituals which were often sexually oriented, and the use of powerful hallucinogenic drugs. This supreme egotist, manipulator, ruthless swindler, and genius of showmanship died a pauper at the age of seventy-two.

Thats pretty much all you need to know about him.

Rabelais, on the other hand, I heartilly recomend. Enjoy!

 
 
 
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William
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07 June 2006 12:46
 

I’m glad you posted that Celsus, because I kind of saw it in reading the Amazon review (by E. Johnson) of Do What Thou Wilt. I was tempted to come back and post a disclaimer.
If he died wore-out, he may have satisfied himself (“did it his way”), but one does not live like that unless their ghosts give them no other choice.
Looking forward to Rabelais.
William

PS-A good book of good books is The Books in My Life by Henry Miller (where I found John Cowper Powys, et al).

 
The Agnostic Gnostic
 
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The Agnostic Gnostic
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07 June 2006 13:36
 

[quote author=“Celsus”]
Rabelais, on the other hand, I heartilly recomend. Enjoy!

I second that.  Rabelais is so good you’ll conshite your breeches.

The AG

 
 
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William
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07 June 2006 14:00
 

LOLOL
Already ROTFLMAO!

 
 
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rab
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10 June 2006 04:30
 

I had to google Rabelais. I found this amusing:

He wrote a famous one-sentence Will: “I have nothing, I owe a great deal, and the rest I leave to the poor,” and his last words were “I am off in search of a great perhaps.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francois_Rabelais

 
 
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kjm
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27 June 2006 15:33
 

Crowley was definitely his own victim—debauchery to the hilt.  He did pen a pretty enjoyable read, though, “The Diary of a Drugfiend”, very erudite and mysterious, great narrative, and, purportedly, ficticious—how better able to fully express it than to be it.  Supposedly, he was channelling some other-world spirits, probably looked like Tolkein’s Urukai or worse, when he wrote “The Book of the Law”.  Though I don’t know firsthand, I understand his “legacy” is still held in higher esteem in some circles—wiccan and the like.

 
 
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Mulefa
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21 September 2006 00:03
 

Crowley knew L Ron Hubbard before he began scientology. Crowley had a dim view of hubbard, who with a friend called Parsons, was trying to conjure a devil of some description. The following is a quote from Corwley:  “Apparently Parsons or Hubbard or somebody is producing a Moonchild. I get fairly frantic when I contemplate the idiocy of these louts.”

In terms of his assessment of Hubbard, “Here, here”.

 
 
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kcmercer
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16 March 2009 17:11
 

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Though overly(and ignorantly) villianized by most Aleister Crowley and his system of Magick deserves serious study by the skeptical and scientific. I have studied and practiced his system of Magick and his Law of Thelema for over ten years, am an avowed skeptic and atheist, and know from experience of his and other systems of spiritual attainment that both Magick and the Book of the Law represent our best examples of a rational approach to spiritual matters. For evidence simply read his “Liber O” and “Liber E”. I challenge anyone to find a better alternative to these when approaching the subjects of Yoga or Ritual Magick. Also, I challenge anyone to make a serious study of the Book of the Law or “Liber Al vel Legis” as the one holy book in the world that not only was written in the original english but is completely devoid of religiosity(the word ‘religion’ doesn’t occur in the book), and superstition.

I could go on for quite awhile on this subject, but I felt it necessary to respond quickly in a favorable light for Crowley and Thelema so that more serious consideration might enter the discussion.

Love is the law, love under will.

 
 
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burt
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16 March 2009 23:26
 
kcmercer - 16 March 2009 09:11 PM

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Though overly(and ignorantly) villianized by most Aleister Crowley and his system of Magick deserves serious study by the skeptical and scientific. I have studied and practiced his system of Magick and his Law of Thelema for over ten years, am an avowed skeptic and atheist, and know from experience of his and other systems of spiritual attainment that both Magick and the Book of the Law represent our best examples of a rational approach to spiritual matters. For evidence simply read his “Liber O” and “Liber E”. I challenge anyone to find a better alternative to these when approaching the subjects of Yoga or Ritual Magick. Also, I challenge anyone to make a serious study of the Book of the Law or “Liber Al vel Legis” as the one holy book in the world that not only was written in the original english but is completely devoid of religiosity(the word ‘religion’ doesn’t occur in the book), and superstition.

I could go on for quite awhile on this subject, but I felt it necessary to respond quickly in a favorable light for Crowley and Thelema so that more serious consideration might enter the discussion.

Love is the law, love under will.

 

Certainly Crowley is worthy of serious and careful study, both in the sense of attention to detail and the sense of being careful when handling dangerous explosives.  Recall his comment that people ought to avoid imitating him, else at the end of the path they come face to face with the Demon Crowley.  I would disagree that his system is the best current example of a rational approach to spiritual matters (various 4th way, and other schools of knowledge come to mind).  My favorite book of his is The Book of Lies, which continues to provide new insights even now, years after I graduated to more refined workings.