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Some funny climatic shit happening. Should we worry?

 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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10 December 2012 23:44
 

I think we need to be careful of what we want to believe and what we are afraid to believe.

It is scary to think our children’s or grandchildren’s lives could be greatly impacted by changes in climate.  My adult son has told me several times that he is considering not having children because he feels the society is on the verge of a big upheaval, and he worries it could get ugly.  (Being mom, I tell him that he is the kind of person we need to see us through changes.) 

Recently I visited a National Park site where Native Americans used to live along a river in cliff dwellings.  The site must have been Eden for awhile, with a dependable water source and mild climate.  But about 700 years ago, the site was abandoned, like numerous similar sites in the Southwest.  Archaeologists posit that it was deteriorating climate and dwindling resources that drove them out.  I’m sure they must have stayed as long as possible and kept hoping things could return to “normal.”  Finally they straggled south to find new homes.

I can picture those ancient times because we too face deteriorating weather in the modern Southwest.  The drought, the worries about low snow and low river flow, the meager harvest, the impacts on wildlife, the fires, the ashy floods from denuded hillsides.

Now they are diverting our limited water to use in fracking, thousands of wells already.

It is hard for me to be optimistic about my state.

 
EN
 
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EN
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11 December 2012 00:12
 

My state needs water, too.  I have drawn up a plan to build massive desalination plants on the Gulf Coast, and a series of canals going inland, all the way to the Ogallala Aquifer. The fresh water from the rising sea will be discharged into the aquifer, where it will feed the major rivers running through the state.  Thus, as the temperatures rise, Texas will turn into a tropical paradise with an endless supply of H2O.  I just need a few hundred billion to pull this off.

 
Dennis Campbell
 
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Dennis Campbell
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11 December 2012 01:01
 
Ecurb Noselrub - 10 December 2012 11:12 PM

My state needs water, too.  I have drawn up a plan to build massive desalination plants on the Gulf Coast, and a series of canals going inland, all the way to the Ogallala Aquifer. The fresh water from the rising sea will be discharged into the aquifer, where it will feed the major rivers running through the state.  Thus, as the temperatures rise, Texas will turn into a tropical paradise with an endless supply of H2O.  I just need a few hundred billion to pull this off.

Nah, Texas would make a great beach instead.

 
 
Skipshot
 
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Skipshot
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11 December 2012 01:10
 
Dennis Campbell - 11 December 2012 12:01 AM
Ecurb Noselrub - 10 December 2012 11:12 PM

My state needs water, too.  I have drawn up a plan to build massive desalination plants on the Gulf Coast, and a series of canals going inland, all the way to the Ogallala Aquifer. The fresh water from the rising sea will be discharged into the aquifer, where it will feed the major rivers running through the state.  Thus, as the temperatures rise, Texas will turn into a tropical paradise with an endless supply of H2O.  I just need a few hundred billion to pull this off.

Nah, Texas would make a great beach instead.

Are you nuts?!  I want to keep Texans in Texas to keep them from fouling the rest of the population.  Work on that proposal, Ecurb!

 
Dennis Campbell
 
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Dennis Campbell
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11 December 2012 01:16
 

Are you nuts?!  I want to keep Texans in Texas to keep them from fouling the rest of the population.  Work on that proposal, Ecurb!

Hey, I was a Texan for a couple of years in the middle 60s.  Granted I lied about that stay for a time, but now that it’s been so long, no longer need to.  Nothing wrong with Teas that a rise in sea level won’t cure as well as a move to Wisconsin.  Other than that, a fine place.

 
 
Larry Olson
 
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Larry Olson
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21 December 2012 02:22
 
Dennis Campbell - 10 December 2012 01:37 PM

Re climate change, it is changing, rapidly.  The question is how to adopt or adapt to it, what can be done in the short term that might mitigate it.  Using this forum as an example, we do not have a consensus that might lead to some coherent world-wide effort, so that seems unlikely.  At best, I’d guess any effort would take decades to have an impact, but maybe I’m wrong.  Wisconsin might not be a bad place to live.

It all depends on technology. Technology changes rapidly.. look at how computers have improved since 1980. Compare the computer from 1980 to a computer in 2012; there is no comparison. If we can rapidly change energy technology the same way computers have progressed, then we can reverse global warming.

My proposal to reverse global warming is to reverse entropy, and I posted some links about the second law of thermodynamics in another thread discussing thermodynamics.  It has been shown that temporarily entropy can be reversed in some experiments, meaning you can temporarily separate hot from cold (violating the second law). This allows a perpetual motion machine of the second kind (one that extracts energy from room temperature substances). That would solve all our energy problems if we could take the energy from fluids around us, instead of fossil fuels.

Now, it sounds crazy and wrong since the second law is supposedly set in stone. But there have been experiments done in Universities that show entropy can be reversed temporarily.  If one can extend these violations over and over again, then there is no need for fossil fuels - energy exists all around us in fluids which was heated up by the sun to maintain room temperature.

What many of us don’t realize, is a lot of the sun’s energy is being wasted maintaining lakes and oceans at room temperature.. where did all that energy go? Do you know how much energy the sun wastes just maintaining the earth and all the lakes at room temp? Almost all the sun’s energy that hits earth is wasted, and turns into the internal energy of water in the ocean. The sun’s energy is sort of stored in the water in lakes and oceans since most of the earth is water covered. It is said that internal energy cannot be exploited… I intend to disprove this. If internal energy of water can be exploited and hot can be separated from cold, then there is no need for fossil fuels or even solar panels. The problem with solar panels is they are quite expensive to produce with exotic materials.  If you create an entropy reversal machine, the energy can be recycled over and over again due to the conservation of energy, but it does violate the second law.

[ Edited: 21 December 2012 02:27 by Larry Olson]
 
Dennis Campbell
 
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Dennis Campbell
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21 December 2012 13:02
 

Woo strikes

 
 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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25 December 2012 18:42
 
Hannah2 - 10 December 2012 10:44 PM

I think we need to be careful of what we want to believe and what we are afraid to believe.

It is scary to think our children’s or grandchildren’s lives could be greatly impacted by changes in climate.  My adult son has told me several times that he is considering not having children because he feels the society is on the verge of a big upheaval, and he worries it could get ugly.  (Being mom, I tell him that he is the kind of person we need to see us through changes.)

Who will be evicted first by rising water?  See trailer of award-winning movie now available on DVD -

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2125435/  (click on ‘WATCH TRAILER’)

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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26 December 2012 02:06
 
unsmoked - 25 December 2012 05:42 PM
Hannah2 - 10 December 2012 10:44 PM

I think we need to be careful of what we want to believe and what we are afraid to believe.

It is scary to think our children’s or grandchildren’s lives could be greatly impacted by changes in climate.  My adult son has told me several times that he is considering not having children because he feels the society is on the verge of a big upheaval, and he worries it could get ugly.  (Being mom, I tell him that he is the kind of person we need to see us through changes.)

Who will be evicted first by rising water?  See trailer of award-winning movie now available on DVD -

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2125435/  (click on ‘WATCH TRAILER’)

Saw the movie.  Very different.  I hear it was inspired by the storm in New Orleans, but lots of imagination too.
Yes, people will be affected in so many areas of the world.

 
goodgraydrab
 
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goodgraydrab
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29 December 2012 00:28
 
Ecurb Noselrub - 10 December 2012 11:12 PM

My state needs water, too.  I have drawn up a plan to build massive desalination plants on the Gulf Coast, and a series of canals going inland, all the way to the Ogallala Aquifer. The fresh water from the rising sea will be discharged into the aquifer, where it will feed the major rivers running through the state.  Thus, as the temperatures rise, Texas will turn into a tropical paradise with an endless supply of H2O.  I just need a few hundred billion to pull this off.

Just make sure you depetrolinate it too cause if that sticky shit gets in there you will have really fucked things up!

 
 
GAD
 
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GAD
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29 December 2012 16:04
 
unsmoked - 25 December 2012 05:42 PM
Hannah2 - 10 December 2012 10:44 PM

I think we need to be careful of what we want to believe and what we are afraid to believe.

It is scary to think our children’s or grandchildren’s lives could be greatly impacted by changes in climate.  My adult son has told me several times that he is considering not having children because he feels the society is on the verge of a big upheaval, and he worries it could get ugly.  (Being mom, I tell him that he is the kind of person we need to see us through changes.)

Who will be evicted first by rising water?  See trailer of award-winning movie now available on DVD -

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2125435/  (click on ‘WATCH TRAILER’)

Watched this last night, more about a little girl and her daddy and their tribal style life in a changing would. To enjoy this movie you really have to forget anything about poverty or rising water and just try and focus on the people, which I found hard to do and so have mixed feelings on this movie.

 
 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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29 December 2012 16:05
 

In his book, ‘THE END OF FAITH’, Sam Harris writes:

”. . . the development of alternative energy technologies should become the object of a new Manhattan Project.  There are, needless to say, sufficient economic and environmental justifications for doing this, but there are political ones as well.  If oil were to become worthless, the dysfunction of the most prominent Muslim societies would suddenly grow as conspicuous as the sun.”

 
 
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