Is separation the problem?

 
Joelle DB
 
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Joelle DB
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Joined  25-02-2008
 
 
 
25 February 2008 21:46
 

Although I have a doctorate in psychology, I am not a philosophy or religion scholar, so I apologize if this is a naive question/thought/observation:

Instead of a question of God versus no God, could the central problem be the theory that there is a separation of God and humans, that God is A being, rather than God IS being? When there is separation, that fissure becomes a giant chasm that swallows up everything. If there is no separation, then there is no one to pray to, no contradictory books dictating behavior that are handed down from the sky, etc.

The Jains sound very evolved, but the Aboriginals from Australia may be even more so and seem to get overlooked. The have had the longest continuous culture on the planet and their spiritual system in which man is not separate seems to be the oldest and most elegant in existence. See Voices of the First Day by Robert Lawlor.

 
 
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SkepticX
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26 February 2008 05:30
 
Joelle DB - 26 February 2008 02:46 AM

See Voices of the First Day by Robert Lawlor.

The reviews are interesting.

Byron

 
 
 
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Carstonio
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26 February 2008 07:45
 
Joelle DB - 26 February 2008 02:46 AM

could the central problem be the theory that there is a separation of God and humans, that God is A being, rather than God IS being?

The latter suggests that “God” is a metaphor for the state of being. A fascinating possibility is that some early theologians indeed used “God” as a synonym for being, and this became mistranslated over the centuries.

 
nachtmusick
 
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nachtmusick
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29 March 2008 04:38
 

I may be incorrect, but I think Confucianism embodies your answer, or at least one answer. 

If you really care, go to “media” on this website, then “video”, then scroll down to the link to “Beyond Belief: Enlightenment 2.0”. 

Then, find the Edward Slingerland presentation, and enjoy. I think he (and the Chinese) hit your nail on the head.

A lot of clicks, I know, but true seekers of enlightenment used to have to ascend tall mountains in bare feet.  Suck it up.