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Subatomic calculations indicate finite lifespan for universe

 
GAD
 
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GAD
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19 February 2013 14:58
 

Say your prayers.

Subatomic calculations indicate finite lifespan for universe

And we won’t even be able to see it coming.

“A little bubble of what you might think of as an ‘alternative’ universe will appear somewhere and then it will expand out and destroy us,” Lykken said, adding that the event will unfold at the speed of light.

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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19 February 2013 22:27
 

Well, thanks for the cheery news.  I mean, when the sun goes supernova, if earthlings are still around then, they’ll probably be tech savvy enough to scoot to another part of the universe.  But when the universe is destroyed, well that’s that.  And the article said it would happen at the speed of light, which sounds fast.  Actually we’d be watching the bubble expanding for thousands or millions or even billions of years, knowing of the impending doom of everything!

 
burt
 
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burt
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19 February 2013 22:43
GAD
 
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19 February 2013 23:44
 
Hannah2 - 19 February 2013 09:27 PM

Well, thanks for the cheery news.  I mean, when the sun goes supernova, if earthlings are still around then, they’ll probably be tech savvy enough to scoot to another part of the universe.  But when the universe is destroyed, well that’s that.  And the article said it would happen at the speed of light, which sounds fast.  Actually we’d be watching the bubble expanding for thousands or millions or even billions of years, knowing of the impending doom of everything!

Because it travels at the speed of light we could not see it coming at all, it will come like a thief in the night.

 
 
Jeff M
 
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20 February 2013 00:18
 

If this theory is correct, it will not happen until after the Sun has consumed the Earth or > 4.5 billion years from now.

If humans make it that far, we currently have no idea what our capabilities will be then, but given that the stone age was just 20,000 years ago,  we will likely be 225,000 times more advanced then, compared to the stone age.  So lets not give up just yet smile

[ Edited: 20 February 2013 01:04 by Jeff M]
 
eudemonia
 
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eudemonia
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20 February 2013 01:40
 

Well, I think the concept of an infinite universe got put on the back burner a while back so,....no real surprise here.
smile

 
 
Jeff M
 
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20 February 2013 01:43
GAD
 
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20 February 2013 03:59
 
Jeff M - 20 February 2013 12:43 AM

Lets put our eye on the fork in the road that we are at now.

I think that belongs on an unsmoked thread.

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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20 February 2013 22:06
 
GAD - 19 February 2013 10:44 PM
Hannah2 - 19 February 2013 09:27 PM

Well, thanks for the cheery news.  I mean, when the sun goes supernova, if earthlings are still around then, they’ll probably be tech savvy enough to scoot to another part of the universe.  But when the universe is destroyed, well that’s that.  And the article said it would happen at the speed of light, which sounds fast.  Actually we’d be watching the bubble expanding for thousands or millions or even billions of years, knowing of the impending doom of everything!

Because it travels at the speed of light we could not see it coming at all, it will come like a thief in the night.

I guess that’s right!  Just one day, poof!

As a matter of fact, it could be happening right now!

 
GAD
 
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21 February 2013 05:40
 
Hannah2 - 20 February 2013 09:06 PM
GAD - 19 February 2013 10:44 PM
Hannah2 - 19 February 2013 09:27 PM

Well, thanks for the cheery news.  I mean, when the sun goes supernova, if earthlings are still around then, they’ll probably be tech savvy enough to scoot to another part of the universe.  But when the universe is destroyed, well that’s that.  And the article said it would happen at the speed of light, which sounds fast.  Actually we’d be watching the bubble expanding for thousands or millions or even billions of years, knowing of the impending doom of everything!

Because it travels at the speed of light we could not see it coming at all, it will come like a thief in the night.

I guess that’s right!  Just one day, poof!

As a matter of fact, it could be happening right now!

Yep poof!

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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21 February 2013 11:30
 

I get that the bubble would expand at light speed.  I wonder if there would be any detectable “disturbance” pushed ahead of it that we could detect?  Like, “Captain, I am picking up a subspace distortion!”

 
Fool4Reason
 
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21 February 2013 12:46
 
GAD - 20 February 2013 02:59 AM
Jeff M - 20 February 2013 12:43 AM

Lets put our eye on the fork in the road that we are at now.

I think that belongs on an unsmoked thread.

Yep, I agree. This excellent article deserves a thread to call it’s own.  I liked it so much I even shared it on my Facebook page. Who knows, maybe it might even distract a few folks from the “does god exist?...” thread.

 
 
Jefe
 
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21 February 2013 12:55
 
Fool4Reason - 21 February 2013 11:46 AM
GAD - 20 February 2013 02:59 AM
Jeff M - 20 February 2013 12:43 AM

Lets put our eye on the fork in the road that we are at now.

I think that belongs on an unsmoked thread.

Yep, I agree. This excellent article deserves a thread to call it’s own.  I liked it so much I even shared it on my Facebook page. Who knows, maybe it might even distract a few folks from the “does god exist?...” thread.

Don’t count your chickens before your eggs.  wink

 
 
GAD
 
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21 February 2013 13:11
 
Hannah2 - 21 February 2013 10:30 AM

I get that the bubble would expand at light speed.  I wonder if there would be any detectable “disturbance” pushed ahead of it that we could detect?  Like, “Captain, I am picking up a subspace distortion!”

Well nothing is supposed to be able to travel faster then light, so I’d say no, poof we are gone and never even know it happened or that we ever existed.

 
 
Fool4Reason
 
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21 February 2013 13:47
 
Jefe - 21 February 2013 11:55 AM
Fool4Reason - 21 February 2013 11:46 AM
GAD - 20 February 2013 02:59 AM
Jeff M - 20 February 2013 12:43 AM

Lets put our eye on the fork in the road that we are at now.

I think that belongs on an unsmoked thread.

Yep, I agree. This excellent article deserves a thread to call it’s own.  I liked it so much I even shared it on my Facebook page. Who knows, maybe it might even distract a few folks from the “does god exist?...” thread.

Don’t count your chickens before your eggs.  wink

It’s all Greek to me wink

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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21 February 2013 15:15
 
GAD - 21 February 2013 12:11 PM
Hannah2 - 21 February 2013 10:30 AM

I get that the bubble would expand at light speed.  I wonder if there would be any detectable “disturbance” pushed ahead of it that we could detect?  Like, “Captain, I am picking up a subspace distortion!”

Well nothing is supposed to be able to travel faster then light, so I’d say no, poof we are gone and never even know it happened or that we ever existed.

Wait, I’m gonna figure this out right now…If an alternate universe pops into existence in our present universe and starts expanding, wouldn’t its gravitational field instantaneously affect the whole present universe?  Hmm?  Especially in closest proximity to the alternative universe?  So we might be able to detect that distortion.  Or maybe the disruption would just wipe us out.  Darn.

But I still hold out hope (from the article):

The calculation requires knowing the mass of the Higgs to within one percent, as well as the precise mass of other related subatomic particles.

“You change any of these parameters to the Standard Model (of particle physics) by a tiny bit and you get a different end of the universe,” Lyyken said.

 
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